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Any advice from managers out there?

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by superchemicalgirl, Oct 27, 2010.

  1. superchemicalgirl

    superchemicalgirl HEN PECKED

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    Vacationland, Maine
    I'm looking for some advice from managers.

    I'm a relatively young professional who, until recently, was very content doing the best job I could in a position without a lot of managerial oversight. In the few years I've worked for the organization I've held many subordinate positions within the same general area; I am content being moved around as the organization sees fit as I realize every position helps the units mission. I strive to be competent in any position in which I'm placed. I do not like to be seen personally or as part of an organization that is viewed as incompetent.

    About two months ago a mid level manager stepped down. The job needed to be filled in the interim. The head boss did whatever brainstorming magic he does and somehow came up with me as the best fit for the job. I originally turned him down for many reasons that I won't go into here. The next day he came to me and asked me to fill it as a personal favor. I accepted.

    So here I am.

    I have no managerial experience and I feel like a bumbling fish out of water when it comes to things like personnel issues. I don't take criticism well (I'm a crier and will freely admit it) - but I also tend to not get constructive criticism (for example it's hard to not cry when the person who stepped down from the position tells you (in front of your other employees) that he doesn't like the direction the unit is headed in since I've been in charge). And for the record, I believe I have made some positive changes and have some fresh ideas. Anyway, I digress. It's the personnel issues that I just can't wrap my head around. For example, I find it absurd that I have to counsel someone twice my age on their inability to show up to work on time chronically. But then again if I didn't have to, there wouldn't be a need for managers.

    So...

    My major question is this: is managing something you grow into feeling comfortable with or do you need a set of skills that I was apparently not born with? Was there any book, lecture, seminar, etc that helped you grow as a manager? Do you continue to feel like you don't know what you're doing (inept managing jokes aside, please)? Is it worth it to be a manager?

    With everything aside, the head boss has been supportive and wishes to mentor me to eventually grow into his position. So I'm not alone. I just don't know if it's something I can do. Managing was never something on my radar (I'm a darned good grunt and proud of it) but now it is. Soon I will need to make a decision whether to apply for the permanent position or not.

    Hopefully my ramble makes some sense... basically just looking for guidance from others in a similar situation. Thanks.
     
  2. Boyd

    Boyd Recipient of The Biff Twang

    Mar 14, 2009
    MI
    Quote:Yes you are, and you should be proud. Of all the grunts being elevated they think you have the most potential... or the best attitude for the position

    Quote:Although there is many many many courses on management, most of them are geared towards running the business end. Any moron can run the numbers.. A manager has to run the people.. People are what make the company turn... quite honestly, you will harden your attitude towards your former co-workers. You will realize which ones are trying to pull something over cuz they knew you "before" and those who think you don't deserve your position.

    For people who can't show up on time? I am sure you have 100 applications for every opening like every other business out there during this economy. Kindly remind said employee. I used a point system at my DC. late is 1 point, calling in without sick days was 2 points... no call late was 3 points.. no call no show was 4 points. 10 points = automatic termination NO MATTER WHAT THE EXCUSE IS.

    Honestly it worked. Not very PC but it worked.


    My major question is this: is managing something you grow into feeling comfortable with or do you need a set of skills that I was apparently not born with? Was there any book, lecture, seminar, etc that helped you grow as a manager? Do you continue to feel like you don't know what you're doing (inept managing jokes aside, please)? Is it worth it to be a manager?

    yes, yes yes yes!!! Once things start clicking and you learn your job, have a good repore with your folks you will be ready to jump out of bed to tackle the day. Soap operas have nothing on being a manager... unless you are on TV for "the office"....

    With everything aside, the head boss has been supportive and wishes to mentor me to eventually grow into his position. So I'm not alone. I just don't know if it's something I can do. Managing was never something on my radar (I'm a darned good grunt and proud of it) but now it is. Soon I will need to make a decision whether to apply for the permanent position or not.

    Hopefully my ramble makes some sense... basically just looking for guidance from others in a similar situation. Thanks.

    Most good managers never wanted the job to begin with.

    Keep that in mind and under your hat [​IMG]

    My dc had 28 drivers, 48 night shift, 15 receiving and seasonal temps.. so it's all relative to size, business, style and resources. What worked for me doesn't work for all you know... There is no how to manage 101 that can effectively work. You need to feel it out and be open to any feedback and criticism.​
     
  3. FarmerJamie

    FarmerJamie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    First of all, CONGRATS!!!!! [​IMG]

    Quote:First thought, the game changes when a "doer" becomes a "director". You can't take the world on your shoulders. If the team clues in that you will pick up the slack, guess where all the hard tasks are going to end up, in your lap. When I made the leap 14 years ago in a similar situation as an IT consultant, I felt into that trap. Luckily, I had a good boss to help mentor me. He even went to key members of the team to explain to them that he was aware of the shenanigans going on and he was holding them accountable in part to my success, too.

    Quote:You're going to figure out how to suck it up and learn to deal with sour grapes. In my first manager role, I was selected over a long-timer who thought he had "done his time in the trenches" and deserved the new job. He fought every decision I made in team meetings and was a general pain in the arse. With a little help from the boss (see above) and a little reaching out to him for minor decisions with little risk to me or the team, I was able to turn him into an ally. When we had the last team meeting before we disbanded to the next assignment, he apologized for his actions and was appreciative of how I approached him and gave him a second chance - lifetime supporter!.

    Quote:14 years and I'm STILL learning. Off the top of my head, I would recommend "First, Break all the Rules", "The First 90 days", and "Crucial Conversations". If you want to PM me, feel free.

    Good luck!!!
     
  4. FarmerJamie

    FarmerJamie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:[​IMG]

    that about sums it up, Boyd.
     
  5. hoppy

    hoppy I'm not all fluff

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    they do offer manageral training courses (my office manager is at one tonight)
    I'm not sure if one is offered in your field, but it doesn't hurt to check.
     
  6. PineappleMama

    PineappleMama Chillin' With My Peeps

    Never been a manager myself but I have had to train those older than me... it was AWFUL.

    I was raised to respect my elders, so correcting (repeatedly) a lady old enough to be my granny just was not comfortable.

    No, I never did 'grow into it'... it was a short stint, but I might have been able to had it gone longer, I'll never know. You've got the potential I think, otherwise you wouldn't be there. You boss believes in you, tears and all.

    Just remember that the grampa you're having to correct like a toddler probably doesn't appreciate being there any more than you do. Maybe that'll help?

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Cindiloohoo

    Cindiloohoo Quiet as a Church Mouse

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    Don't let training those older than you become a hang up. It is your job now to train those folks. You can do that and still be respectful of your elders. [​IMG] It's the disrespectful snotty little younguns that gets on everyones nerves [​IMG]
     
  8. Dunkopf

    Dunkopf Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 24, 2010
    Kiowa, Colorado
    They obviously see something in you that makes them think you are capable of doing the job. All you need is some confidence

    Most places offer management courses to help you deal with employees and do it in a professional manner. There are also tons of books out there. We have to read at least one per month.

    Good luck.
     
  9. superchemicalgirl

    superchemicalgirl HEN PECKED

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    Vacationland, Maine
    Thank you guys so much for the support and advice. It is very much appreciated.

    I'd write more now but I have to go peel and core 8 quarts of apples for the unit fall get together tomorrow [​IMG]

    Again, thanks.
     
  10. debilorrah

    debilorrah The Great Guru of Yap Premium Member

    First off it IS absurd that you have to counsel someone twice your age to show up on time. That is why you are a manager and that person is not. You have shown leadership skills to your superiors and they have placed you in a role they are aware that you are not trained in. They also know you will succeed.

    People are a big pain in the butt. Someone who is 50 is bitter because they are stuck in a low to mid level position, but they did it to themselves. Some people never change. We have a gal that uses every single bit of her sick time as soon as it is accrued. So they hired me as the Office Manager and never even offered it to her. And yes, I am lucky enough to share an office with her.

    You will have to deal with each person indivdually, knowing they all have to follow the same rules.
     

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