Any Advice on Breeds for a Newbie who hasn't yet started her flock??

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by LDberlinn, Dec 10, 2011.

  1. LDberlinn

    LDberlinn Out Of The Brooder

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    I have done a lot of research on different chicken breeds and the types that would work in my environment. But I'd like to hear from experienced owner's on if there is a number or type of breed that would be easily manageable for a newbie chickie momma. [​IMG] Like I said in my subject, I've yet to start my flock. I want to have all of the information I can possibly have on every aspect so nothing is a surprise, if that is possible! [​IMG] I have also done a TON of research on every type of coop out there and what would work in my yard, along with possible free-ranging (When I'm able to stare at them while they are out haha [​IMG]) Any information that is out there is completely welcome!!
     
  2. aoxa

    aoxa Overrun With Chickens

    I'm going to say Buff Orpington & Barred Rocks [​IMG] Both work very well for standards. BR Lay well. The Orpingtons, not as well, but can be decent layers.

    If you want an egg a day, I would go with the production red.

    Welcome to BYC!
     
  3. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Glad you are thinking it through and doing your research before you jump in. But I really can't offer any advice. I don't know your environment or your goals.
     
  4. LDberlinn

    LDberlinn Out Of The Brooder

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    Quote:Thank you! I have thought about both of those breeds, glad to see I'm on the right track [​IMG] I am as excited as kid on Christmas to get my coop and girls all together!!
     
  5. LDberlinn

    LDberlinn Out Of The Brooder

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    Quote:I'm looking for eggs and friendly pets [​IMG] I am in Nor-Cal where it gets very hot, can freeze and we get some good bouts of rain.
     
  6. nurse_turtle

    nurse_turtle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Silkies are not very hot tolerant. I am a newbie as well and have a mixed flock which has been really easy to care for. As low maintenance as chickens can be. I have a flock of 30. My chickens include. frizzled silkie, Polish/silkie mixes, Polish, Barred-rock, Dominique (my fav), a showgirl, and 1 super tiny chicken about the size of a pigeon and have no idea how she came from the same batch as her brood mates. I believe a mixed flock will bring lots of enjoyment and personalities. Happy chicken raising![​IMG]
     
  7. teach1rusl

    teach1rusl Love My Chickens

    My advice is start with the largest coop you can affort to build, but with just a small flock. I suggest a mixed flock, because this allows you to find which breeds you really like. This way you can get your feet wet raising chickens, plus it gives you space to expand if you want, down the road. I frequently find breeds that I'd love to try, but I cap myself based on the housing I have (which I WISH I'd built bigger).
    Breeds I've enjoyed have been plymouth rocks, australorps, orpingtons, and EEs of the LF. Of my bantams, I've enjoyed the d'uccles and silkies, although I don't think I'll take in any more feather footed breeds...and while my silkies are cuties, I'm not crazy about their broodiness. All the chickens I've mentioned are docile, and quite friendly if handled or interacted with on a regular basis.
     
  8. LDberlinn

    LDberlinn Out Of The Brooder

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    Quote:I was hoping to have a slikie bantam because they are so darn cute! but not if they don't have a heat tolerance. Would having a system of mist-ers help with that do you think?
     
  9. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    About any chicken can handle very hot, occasional freezes, and rain. The key is a well ventilated coop and shade, as you probably know. I have not had chickens with feathers on their legs, so I don't have actual experience with them and mud. Hopefully someone who has experience will chime in.

    Certain breeds do have tendencies, but friendly depends a whole lot on how much you fool with them, especially when they are young. There is nothing unethical about bribing them with food either.

    Any of the dual purpose breeds should do well for you. Black Australorp and Delaware top my list for personality, but honestly the Orpington, Sussex, any of the Rocks or Wyandottes, New Hampshires, Turkens, Easter Eggers, or Rhode Island Reds will all work well. For pure egg laying, it is hard to beat Leghorns. They are supposed to be a little flighty but with proper bribery and handling you should be able to overcome that.

    If you don't want roosters, the sex links are great possibilities. If you are getting chicks, you take a chance of getting some roosters unless you get sex links. Some hatcheries provide the commercial breeds of sex links, Cackle and McMurray I believe, while others like Ideal cross two regular breeds to make their sex links. I think Meyer gives you a choice. The commercial breeds tend to lay more and larger eggs than the crosses, and may have a few more potential medical problems, especially if you feed them a diet high in protein, but either would probably fit you circumstances well. It is really hard to pick one that won't suit you.

    I'd tend to stay away from the decorative breeds, like Silkies and Polish. They usually don't lay that well to start with and they tend to go broody pretty often, which further cuts into your egg laying.

    I probably have not helped you any, but I really think it is hard to go wrong.
     
  10. LDberlinn

    LDberlinn Out Of The Brooder

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    Quote:All information is helpful, I really appreciate your input! [​IMG] I can now go forward with finding my perfect chickies, knowing that much more about each breed [​IMG] Thank you!
     

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