Any Home Bakers Here?

pennyJo1960

Yippity do Da Yippity ay
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6 Years
Dec 29, 2015
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I stumbled across it for the first time after reading this thread and looking it up. I found it’s mostly related to sour doughs, but can be used with yeast breads. That was probably the hardest part, as many sites mention it for yeast breads, but few offer much explanation.

Most of them autolyse their flours with yeast included, then admit it’s more fermentation than autolysis. 😖 I was forced to improvise that step.
Interesting learn something new daily.
Morning Home Bakers!
 

MTKitty

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Aug 14, 2021
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WOW...first ...I am impressed. It is BEAUTIFUL.
May we see the Recipe for this Keeper. Aria
As you wish ... a rather lengthy recounting of my process. I did put the ingredients at the top, as that was all I really started with:

flour 570g 100%
water 371g 65%
yeast 9g 1.6%
salt 11g 2%
sugar 9g 1.6%
oil 3g .5%

… and promptly started messing with it, to suit myself. In my defense, I didn’t go too far astray.

I did the magic mix (described below, for those interested. Or not) and three risings (as suggested by @wyoDreamer, I think. Thank you!). For the last proofing (all done at 78* on the box setting), I put the dough on parchment paper before dumping it into the bowl, seam side down. I put my cast iron in the oven at 450* for 30 minutes. The pot and lid aren’t fully seasoned, so I took the opportunity to grease the pot. After taking it out of the oven, I (carefully) wiped the smoking grease out of the pan - deciding to use parchment paper was a bit of a last minute decision.

I slashed the bread top, feeling like some kind of knife-wielding psycho, and plopped it into the pot. It sizzled immediately (so cool!). I re-covered the pot and set it back in the oven, reducing the temp to 425*, for 25 minutes. I removed the top, reduced the heat to 400*, and went another 12 minutes. I’ll monkey with times and temperatures next time.

The magic mix went something like this: I made a levain from 30g flour (can’t remember now if I mixed it, I think it was straight white flour), 30g water, the sugar and yeast. I let that sit in the box at 72* while most of the rest of the flour (400g white, 140g whole wheat - again, on a whim) autolysed with 341g of warm water for 30 minutes on the counter (next time, in the box). I did reserve 30g of the flour for dusting surfaces during kneading. I ended up not using it all.

After 30 minutes, I added 10g salt (because I was getting nervous at 8g and 11g sounded/looked like a lot) and oil to the levain. As soon as I started working the levain into the rest of the dough, I decided to sprinkle the salt over the dough next time instead of adding it like I did. But, whatever. If it works, it works. If it doesn’t, I’ll eat it anyway to keep from wasting it.

Another first for me: I really stink at judging “doubled in size.” This time, I took a photo of the dough at the start of a rise and compared it as time went along. It helped.

Fwiw, the bread makes a good toasted cheese. I was going to share a picture, but my dog made me eat the sandwich instead. Bad dog!
 

Aria

Crossing the Road
11 Years
Oct 15, 2010
3,882
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As you wish ... a rather lengthy recounting of my process. I did put the ingredients at the top, as that was all I really started with:

flour 570g 100%
water 371g 65%
yeast 9g 1.6%
salt 11g 2%
sugar 9g 1.6%
oil 3g .5%

… and promptly started messing with it, to suit myself. In my defense, I didn’t go too far astray.

I did the magic mix (described below, for those interested. Or not) and three risings (as suggested by @wyoDreamer, I think. Thank you!). For the last proofing (all done at 78* on the box setting), I put the dough on parchment paper before dumping it into the bowl, seam side down. I put my cast iron in the oven at 450* for 30 minutes. The pot and lid aren’t fully seasoned, so I took the opportunity to grease the pot. After taking it out of the oven, I (carefully) wiped the smoking grease out of the pan - deciding to use parchment paper was a bit of a last minute decision.

I slashed the bread top, feeling like some kind of knife-wielding psycho, and plopped it into the pot. It sizzled immediately (so cool!). I re-covered the pot and set it back in the oven, reducing the temp to 425*, for 25 minutes. I removed the top, reduced the heat to 400*, and went another 12 minutes. I’ll monkey with times and temperatures next time.

The magic mix went something like this: I made a levain from 30g flour (can’t remember now if I mixed it, I think it was straight white flour), 30g water, the sugar and yeast. I let that sit in the box at 72* while most of the rest of the flour (400g white, 140g whole wheat - again, on a whim) autolysed with 341g of warm water for 30 minutes on the counter (next time, in the box). I did reserve 30g of the flour for dusting surfaces during kneading. I ended up not using it all.

After 30 minutes, I added 10g salt (because I was getting nervous at 8g and 11g sounded/looked like a lot) and oil to the levain. As soon as I started working the levain into the rest of the dough, I decided to sprinkle the salt over the dough next time instead of adding it like I did. But, whatever. If it works, it works. If it doesn’t, I’ll eat it anyway to keep from wasting it.

Another first for me: I really stink at judging “doubled in size.” This time, I took a photo of the dough at the start of a rise and compared it as time went along. It helped.

Fwiw, the bread makes a good toasted cheese. I was going to share a picture, but my dog made me eat the sandwich instead. Bad dog!
Thanks. Very detailed and will be trying it soon.
Aria
 

ronott1

A chicken will always remember the egg
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Mar 31, 2011
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I make nut butters for Christmas gifts. One friend requested I not do that this year, as her hubby has problems with kidney stones, and nuts are on the no-no list. So I hope they like sourdough bread. I have Ron's starter started, and when that silicone mat gets here, I'm going to start baking.
You are a good friend!
 

Sequel

Enabler
6 Years
Feb 17, 2015
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Kitsap County, Western Washington
I make nut butters for Christmas gifts. One friend requested I not do that this year, as her hubby has problems with kidney stones, and nuts are on the no-no list. So I hope they like sourdough bread. I have Ron's starter started, and when that silicone mat gets here, I'm going to start baking.
I send out of town in laws homemade jam from our berries. My sister in law called me a couple weeks ago to make sure I pack it better this year because one of the jars broke and she was quite clear that her heart was broken! Lol!
 

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