any one have progressive lenses?

Discussion in 'Family Life - Stories, Pictures & Updates' started by key west chick, Jun 17, 2011.

  1. key west chick

    key west chick Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 31, 2008
    Gainesville, GA
    So at my last eye exam, I was informed I need progressive lenses, aka bi-focals... So I picked them up today and OMG, I cant see a thing! He told me it would take awhile to get used to them. Up close I can see just fine, but my distance and peripheral vision is wonky. When I was walking out to the car, it looked like the whole parking lot sloped up and I felt like I was gonna bust my fannie. My mom has them and said it took her about 2 weeks to get used to them. Anybody else have any experience?
     
  2. Crazy4mypeeps

    Crazy4mypeeps Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 17, 2011
    Nebraska
    UGH, I'm at that stage too. Dreading every minute of it. Haven't made the leap yet though.
     
  3. eenie114

    eenie114 Completly Hopeless

    I had bifocals before I switched to contact lenses, and yes, they take some getting used to. However, the size of the 'reading window' (bottom part) can differ. Maybe try getting ones with smaller windows? I had fairly small ones, and they took about three or four days to get used to.
    Good luck!
     
  4. Grand-hen-ma

    Grand-hen-ma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 25, 2010
    Hudson Florida
    I have had mine for over a year now. It took a few days to get used to and they are fine now. Give it time and all will get better.
     
  5. Laurajean

    Laurajean Slightly Touched

    Apr 2, 2010
    New Hampshire
    I was a Licensed Optician for many years, so I'll offer a couple of tips. First of all, remember to "point your nose" at whatever you want to look at. Without glasses, we are used to using our peripheral field of vision, we do it without realizing it, and you can no longer do that with progressive lenses. Practice pointing your nose; if you're driving and you want to check your dash gauges, don't move your eyes, move your nose. Your nose should always line up with the proper area of the lens. Also, if you continue to find that your distance field feels "off", it may be. You might need the glasses adjusted slightly to rest lower on your nose. It could be that the "intermediate" area, in the middle of the lens, meant for arms length distances, is too high and coming up into your distance range. When we measure for progressive lenses, we carefully line up where the frame sits on your face, and measure the trifocal to start at your pupil. Often times, people go home and wear their glasses differently than they did when we made this measurement, they may wear them higher or lower on their nose than when we measured. So if you go back in for an adjustment, be sure to wear the glasses how you normally do, and tell this to the Optician. They may measure it to be where the frame "should" sit on your face as opposed to where you "actually" wear the frame. And remember, the bottom is for reading, the middle is for intermediate things, ie, arms length, and the top is of course distance. They DO take adjusting, time-wise, even as an Optician, it took me a while to get used to them. The nose-pointing thing is key. And also the position of the frame on your face, so be sure to go back for an adjustment if you feel the middle area is sitting too high. You can test this by lowering the glasses slightly further down on your nose. If you see better this way, then you need to bring them in to have them adjusted to sit lower. I hope this helps! Most people adjust to them after some practice, and of course there are some people who just can't get used to it and need to go back to lines. Give it a while and see.
     
  6. ranchhand

    ranchhand Rest in Peace 1956-2011

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    Aug 25, 2008
    SC
    Laurajean nailed it, from the professional perspective. From the user perspective, she's absolutely correct, as well! It took 3-4 days to adjust to my tridocals- the worst part was a sore neck from searching up and down for the "sweet spot" for each task. One caution- pay VERY close attention to where your feet are! I tended to trip over things at first. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2011
  7. Crazy4mypeeps

    Crazy4mypeeps Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nebraska
    Quote:I watched my mother face plant into the pavement after getting her's. Maybe that's why I'm so hesitant to even try them. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2011
  8. Laurajean

    Laurajean Slightly Touched

    Apr 2, 2010
    New Hampshire
    Quote:I watched my mother face plant into the pavement after getting her's. Maybe that's why I'm so hesitant to even try them. [​IMG]

    Believe me, I've heard many stories of this through the years. And even I had a horrible time on stairs when I first got them, because I'd try to glance down at me feet, which of course was really looking through the reading area, and throwing off my judgment. One thing that frustrates me is that many Opticians don't fully inform the patient about all of the things I mentioned in my above post. They simply boast "no lines" and sell them, and then the patient is shocked at the adjustment period. I personally took the time to fully inform my patients of all aspects, pros and cons of a progressive lens. Sometimes I'd have a patient come in for an adjustment, or with confusion about getting used to them, and I would find that my very own co-workers who sold them the glasses did not educate them first. I would explain "pointing with the nose", the three different distance uses, etc., and they would say "Oh, the guy who sold them to me didn't say ANY of this!" Then I'd have to apologize and try to help them adjust AFTER they spent $300.00. So most of those horror stories about people falling all over the place are told by patients who were not properly informed before their purchase. Of course there are always *some* people who are simply not cut out for even attempting to adjust, such as some elderly patients. I never cared how much of a commission we made on progressive lenses (and there IS an extra commission for that), I STILL would advise a patient to stick with the lines they've been wearing for 20 years if I felt they would have difficulty with progressives. But of course, my goal was actually to please the patient, unlike some of my less ethical co-workers.
     
  9. Crazy4mypeeps

    Crazy4mypeeps Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 17, 2011
    Nebraska
    LauraJean, you ROCK, girl!!!
     
  10. gryeyes

    gryeyes Covered in Pet Hair & Feathers

    I wear progressive tri-focals, and my opthamologist explained how to deal with them EXACTLY the way LauraJean has done. He particularly warned me about driving, as peripheral vision is normally used a LOT for that activity. No glancing up into the rear view mirrors or left or right for side view mirrors; one must point one's nose directly up or to the sides to see the mirror images clearly. He also warned me I would still have an adjustment period whilst my brain learned to deal with the lenses. I was nearly "seasick" for close to a week before my brain just suddenly got with the program.

    Just a couple of months ago I had to have my prescription changed (after *ahem* 3 years of not getting eye exams) and my brain still wanted to use the previous "settings" for a while. But boy, I love my glasses! I would not relish changing from reading glasses to driving glasses, or Jes' Walkin' Around glasses!
     

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