Any tips on electricity in the run? How many outlets etc?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by fiddlebanshee, Jul 21, 2011.

  1. fiddlebanshee

    fiddlebanshee Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 11, 2010
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    So the electrician is coming out in two weeks to get electricity to the coop. The conduit is already in the ground, he just needs to pull the wires and install the fixtures. So what do I want in a 7x8' walk-in coop? This is my list, please let me know if I am forgetting anything:

    1. four outlets, two at one side, and two at the other side of the entrance door, to plug in a brood lamp, a fan, a heated waterdish and other assorted appliances as needed.
    2. a light fixture at the ceiling in the middle of the coop
    3. a light fixture with a low level light near the door as a night light (is this necessary?)
    4. what else? More than four outlets?

    We'll have 20 amps worth of power.

    Your ideas are welcome. Many thanks in advance.
     
  2. deerman

    deerman Rest in Peace 1949-2012

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    I would double check about 20 amps, heaters , brooders , will pull alot of amps.....but if the proper breaker is use for wire size it will be safe.

    Check and see how many amps total the heaters ,brooder , and etc. also make sure they use weather tite outlets boxes
     
  3. swmalone

    swmalone Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well considering my chickens are lucky if they get an extension cord ran to their coop for some light/heat I think you are probably doing better than most.
     
  4. CC1892

    CC1892 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi!
    I just had this done to our 4x4 coop, and yes 20 amps is about right.
    I had an old bathroom porcelain fixture hard wired at the top of the door (really nice condition).
    Presently, a regular bulb is in it now to lore the chicks back into the coop at night.
    For cold winter nights, I will exchange the regular bulb with a red heat bulb.

    An outlet was installed at the ceiling, where I have a fan plugged now that is set at the window.
    I thought I might need an extra outlet, until the other day I found a square adapter that has 2 sets of prongs on the back.
    It fits nicely into the entire ceiling outlet, it's very strong so it won't pull out, best of all, I now have 6 outlets.
    I can now plug in 2 birdbath de-icers for water (for coop & run), and a timer with a night light for extra "daylight" later on.
    There is room for a ceramic heater if needed.

    I saved a little money by hunting around the house, finding all kinds
    of parts and spare items to use in the coop. That part was fun!
    Good Luck.
    CC
     
  5. Mikey D

    Mikey D Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 12, 2011
    Apache Junction AZ
    Hi FiddleB,

    If he (or she) has not pulled the wire yet than STOP THE PRESSES!

    Your max current draw will be determined by the size of the wire in the conduit, this wire and the subsequent circuits will then be protected by the correctly sized breaker in your panel.

    12 Ga wire will allow you 20 amps.
    If you have them install 10 ga wire you can run up to 30 amps 8 ga will get you 50 amps. (these last two figures are from memory but they're close - have them checked for accuracy)

    I'm not saying that you need 50 amp service in your coop but a 1500W heater will use 3/4 of you 20 amp supply. A couple of hundred watts for a fan, a few more for a light and you have used up your capacity & will trip a breaker if you plug anything else in. I always size my conductore for a little more power than I think I'll need.

    Another option (and my personal favorite) is to run 220VAC to the coop (It is only one more wire) and put a small sub panel inside (We have 2 subs in my garage, one outside for the car port/work area, another in the laundry room for the extention, one in the office upstairs and yet another in the back yard waiting for me to build a shop). If you have an honest electrician working to code is should not cost too much more and this way you would have room for exapansion.

    Just some food for thought.

    Mikey
     
  6. Farmer_Dan

    Farmer_Dan Chillin' With My Peeps

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    From doing some of my own electrical work and being friends with a few electricians, here's my suggestions:

    Double the number of outlets you plan on needing.
    Double the number of light fixtures that you plan on needing.

    Reason is, it's relatively cheap to just add a couple more and it's easy enough not to use it if you find you don't need it.


    Also, if I may suggest, I recommend using GFI outlets in the run. It's potentially wet in there, like a kitchen or a bathroom.


    PS. 20 amps sounds fine and even possibly overkill, but with electrical, ALWAYS overbuild.
     
  7. Mikey D

    Mikey D Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 12, 2011
    Apache Junction AZ
    Quote:Dan is very correct, in fact if you are doing this to NEC (National Electrical Code) it is mandatory (and smart besides).
     
  8. colebarnhart

    colebarnhart Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Well that sucks!!! I've already got it all wired up, dug, buried and etc!!!! So 12Ga is the filter for amps and there is no way of getting more out of it or beefing it up somehow? I've got the coop insulated good and wasn't sure this coming winter if I needed a heater or if I could just put some heat bulbs in the light fixtures instead, but now I think this pretty much answers that question [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2011
  9. Mikey D

    Mikey D Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 12, 2011
    Apache Junction AZ
    Well that sucks!!! I've already got it all wired up, dug, buried and etc!!!! So 12Ga is the filter for amps and there is no way of getting more out of it or beefing it up somehow? I've got the coop insulated good and wasn't sure this coming winter if I needed a heater or if I could just put some heat bulbs in the light fixtures instead, but now I think this pretty much answers that question [​IMG]

    Not necessarily. Could you pull one more 12 ga wire throught your conduit. This would allow you to use a 2 pole 20amp breaker giving you twice the power. If the conduit is small & has fewer than 3 - 90 degree bends I think it would be easier to remove the first threee wires and pull all 4 through at once.

    Never say never Fival!

    Mikey​
     
  10. CupOJoe42

    CupOJoe42 CT Chicken Whisperer

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    You might want an outlet if you decide to go with an automatic door opener or wiring for a thermostat???

    FYI - My BIL is an electrician, but he HATES chickens, so I think I would rather pay someone else to do the wiring, than ask him and hear him complaining.
     

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