any truth to this?

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by danielle82, Nov 24, 2009.

  1. danielle82

    danielle82 A Good Egg

    Apr 27, 2009
    Tonasket Wa
    Someone is selling ground organic soybean saying if you give it to the hens they will lay eggs through winter...I thought it was the length of daylight that triggered egglaying? Has anyone heard of this? Is there a small shred of truth in this claim? I might try it depending on the cost...
    Thoughts? Opinions?
     
  2. Matt A NC

    Matt A NC Overrun With Chickens

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    All that is doing is increasing the amount of protein the birds are getting.

    Sounds like a sells tactic that is just a big stinky pile.

    Matt
     
  3. danielle82

    danielle82 A Good Egg

    Apr 27, 2009
    Tonasket Wa
    a stinky pile of...poo? lol
     
  4. pips&peeps

    pips&peeps There is no "I" in Ameraucana

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    Given in the wrong amounts, soy can really mess up your hen's reproductive organs.
     
  5. danielle82

    danielle82 A Good Egg

    Apr 27, 2009
    Tonasket Wa
    pips&peeps :

    Given in the wrong amounts, soy can really mess up your hen's reproductive organs.

    really? what is in it that does that? definately want to avoid it!​
     
  6. Matt A NC

    Matt A NC Overrun With Chickens

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    The high protein can increase the size of the egg beyond their laying capability. That why you need a good balance and lots of calcium. The calcium not only improves the thickness of the shell so that is doesn't break inside the hen, but also helps strengthen the muslces the hens use to push the egg out. Basic explanation, but to the point.

    Matt
     
  7. pips&peeps

    pips&peeps There is no "I" in Ameraucana

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    and, high doses of plant estrogens.
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2009
  8. wombat

    wombat Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 23, 2009
    Raw soy has trypsin inhibitors that can affect growth. There may be other consequences, the jury's still out on them. Soy that has been cooked/boiled has most of this neutralized, and fermented soy has this more neutralized. Humans and poultry can be affected, cattle are not; I guess if you have extra stomachs, you get a pass on this one.

    I doubt that there is anything magic about feeding soy beans. It's more likely that with non-caged flocks, there's less insect protein to be had during the winter months, so any feeding solution that provides the right amount of protein is what's needed. It probably works like magic if you're only feeding corn and your birds are poorly nurished during winter months as a result; I'd guess that would be the origin of the old' timer's tales. I doubt it is any more useful than any other proper diet with proper protein levels, though.

    You might also have a flock that's meeting some of its calcium needs from insects, earth, and greens during warmer months, and these could be lacking in the winter months. If you're feeding a "layer" diet, you're probably feeding enough calcium. If you have concerns that you are not, put out some free-choice oyster shell. I'd recomend putting this in a separate feeder, and not mixed in with the regular feed. You can actually feed too much calcium, and end up with rough-shelled eggs, or with eggs that can't be pipped by hatching chicks because the shells can get too thick. If the shells on the eggs you are getting are looking good, then adding more calcium is not going to get you more eggs.
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2009
  9. ChooksChick

    ChooksChick BeakHouse's Mad Chicken Scientist

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    Also, if your flock is in a molt, they'll 'spend' most of their protein growing new feathers. This is part of the cause of Winter break from laying (along with the hours of light).

    If you bump up the protein, many will recover from their molt faster, so that's probably the reason the sellers of this supplement say that. Results are dependent on the type of molt they have (some never quit, others quit for a long time, genetically dictated) as well.

    Many owners will bump up the protein during or at the end of a molt by feeding game bird mix, which is largely the same as layer crumbles, but with more protein.

    Edited to fix run-on sentences and ridiculous verbiage.
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2009

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