Any way to save a duckling with a broken leg?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by shortgrass, May 3, 2017.

  1. shortgrass

    shortgrass Overrun With Chickens

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    Title pretty much sums it up...stepdaughters dog got off his chain and attacked a mallard hen with a brood of 15 2 week old ducklings. One has a broken leg, right above the little knee joint. I tried to put it in the brooder but its frantic.


    Is there any way it will even heal? I can put a few of its broodmates in there with it to keep it company, but I'm splitting up the brood to try to save one broken duck.


    Will it ever recover or should we just let it be and let nature take its course? :hit


    TIA
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2017
  2. chicknmania

    chicknmania Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Can you splint it? Maybe with a piece of popsicle stick and some vet wrap? Is the hen still alive?
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2017
  3. shortgrass

    shortgrass Overrun With Chickens

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    Yes, the hen is fine, actually.. It was just the one duckling that got injured in the ruckus..


    It was too much for us to do. It was a wild Mallard, so it will end up first in the predator plate as soon as they are able to fly.

    So we gave it to a friend if our daughters, maybe she can help the poor little guy and baby it more than we could have. He was doing good hobbling on it, but just not ever going to be able to keep up with the brood.


    Thanks for the suggestion, I'll pass it on, it might work for her :)
     
  4. chicknmania

    chicknmania Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    That's too bad, I hope it makes it. Best suggestion actually would have been to take it to a wildlife rehab center. They are best at what they do, and they can possibly rehab it enough to return to the wild, or at least, make it comfortable and an ambassador for wildlife education to the public.
     

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