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Anyone entering county/state fairs?

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by blessedchickenmama7, Jul 25, 2008.

  1. blessedchickenmama7

    blessedchickenmama7 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 12, 2008
    Western NC
    I was wondering if anyone is entering any fairs with their chickens? I have never done it, and mine are all still young. My oldest are 3 months. But our fair is 2-3 months out still.

    Any advice?
     
  2. lurky

    lurky Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 4, 2007
    Western MA
    I dont know what other fairs are like, but our county fair runs for 5 days and your required to have the birds there before it opens.....and cannot remove them til its over. I couldn't make my birds sit in a cage that long. Plus, when i have been at fairs, i find them with no food or water (which i must correct) and they knock it over pacing the little cage being unhappy [​IMG] I think it would be impossible to be there the entire time. I am sure other fairs are better than this, but i was not impressed with a few i have been to. I have found only one that i was impressed by in MA.
     
  3. perfectly_polish

    perfectly_polish Overrun With Chickens

    Mar 1, 2007
    CT
    Quote:If birds are pacing in there cage, they are nervous and shouldn't be shown, you need to train a bird before bringing it to a show, so it won't stress out.
     
  4. perfectly_polish

    perfectly_polish Overrun With Chickens

    Mar 1, 2007
    CT
    Quote:I've been showing birds for about 2 years. Advice? Make sure your birds are vaccinated and tested, or you won't be able to show them. Make sure they are in their best condition and up to their breed standards. They'll need to bathed before the show, and they also need to "trained" so they don't get stressed out and will be able to be handled by the judge.
     
  5. lurky

    lurky Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 4, 2007
    Western MA
    Quote:If birds are pacing in there cage, they are nervous and shouldn't be shown, you need to train a bird before bringing it to a show, so it won't stress out.

    I was not talking about MY birds.......I have NEVER put mine in a fair [​IMG] I much prefer the online BYC style poultry shows. Way less stress on the birds [​IMG]
     
  6. perfectly_polish

    perfectly_polish Overrun With Chickens

    Mar 1, 2007
    CT
    Quote:If birds are pacing in there cage, they are nervous and shouldn't be shown, you need to train a bird before bringing it to a show, so it won't stress out.

    I was not talking about MY birds.......I have NEVER put mine in a fair [​IMG] I much prefer the online BYC style poultry shows. Way less stress on the birds [​IMG]

    Oh I know, I was just saying if a bird, anyone's bird is pacing at a show it shouldn't be shown because they are too stressed out. I like the BYC shows too, much easier and less preparation [​IMG]
     
  7. blessedchickenmama7

    blessedchickenmama7 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 12, 2008
    Western NC
    How do you train a bird not to be nervous and stress out, other than handling it a lot yourself. But that still doesn't really deal with the being caged up. Unless you train them to tolerate the confined space by sometimes putting them in one?

    Sonia
     
  8. KKluckers

    KKluckers Time Out

    Sep 4, 2007
    Quote:I've been showing birds for about 2 years. Advice? Make sure your birds are vaccinated and tested, or you won't be able to show them. Make sure they are in their best condition and up to their breed standards. They'll need to bathed before the show, and they also need to "trained" so they don't get stressed out and will be able to be handled by the judge.

    I totally agree. I handle my birds alot so they are not stressed at show. They are actually little hams for the camera. Just make sure also your birds are not to juvenile looking. Like with my Orpingtons it takes them 8 months before I will show them. Good Luck and I hope you do well. [​IMG]
     
  9. perfectly_polish

    perfectly_polish Overrun With Chickens

    Mar 1, 2007
    CT
    Quote:How well your bird places in a show depends on its condition, its disposition, how closely it conforms to the standard description for its breed and variety (for purebred/exhibition category), and how it compares with other birds in its category at the show.

    Select your birds early. Allow sufficient time for preparation and training. Birds should be trained and prepared to display their best qualities. Birds unaccustomed to confinement in cages do not "show" to their best advantage unless trained beforehand.

    Getting birds accustomed to a cage is a simple process if started early. At least one week before the show, place each show bird in a cage similar to ones used by poultry shows. Handle each bird two to three times a day in a manner similar to that used in judging.

    The procedure for properly removing a bird from a cage is a three-step operation:

    * Step 1. Approach the cage slowly, open the door quietly and prepare to remove the bird, head first. Maneuver the bird until it stands with its head to your right or left. Then reach into the coop and across the back of the bird with your right hand (left-handed persons will use their left hand), firmly but gently grasp the most distant wing at the shoulder. Keep the wing folded and close to the bird's body.
    * Step 2. Rotate the bird in the cage so that its head is pointing toward you and the open door.
    * Step 3. Slide your free hand, palm upward, underneath the bird's breast. Simultaneously, grasp the bird's right leg (just above the hock joint) between your thumb and index finger while clasping the left leg between the second and third fingers. This places your index and second fingers between the bird's legs. The keel bones should be resting upon the palm of your hand.

    Bring the bird out of the cage head first, keeping its head toward you. After holding the bird for awhile, open the wings and examine various parts of the body. Always return the bird to the cage head first and lower it gently to the floor of the cage. To determine body balance and "set of legs", some judges like to drop heavy breed birds about 6 inches to the cage floor. A quick recovery means good balance and placement of legs. When accustomed to this confinement and handling, the bird will present a good appearance to the judge. Many entries of good merit are never seriously considered by the judge because they have not been trained. Frightened birds tend to stand in a crouched rather than normal position, thus their true type is not revealed to the judge. The tail may touch the cage and be carried to one side, the bird may become restless from confinement, the cage litter may not feel natural and the bird may assume an awkward posture. Birds unaccustomed to handling may struggle when examined. Any of these things will give the judge unfavorable impressions. Therefore, it is recommended that you train your birds to get used to a cage.
     
  10. blessedchickenmama7

    blessedchickenmama7 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 12, 2008
    Western NC
    Thank you PerfectlyPolish. My babies are too young this year I think, but by next year I'll know if I have any birds of good enough quality to even bother. The ones I would even consider are handled a lot, but not in the way you mentioned. So, I'll have to practice that.

    Sonia
     

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