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Anyone ever cared for a hurt bunny successfully?!? Bunny people please advise!

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by pixiedouglas, Oct 14, 2014.

  1. pixiedouglas

    pixiedouglas Chillin' With My Peeps

    On Saturday morning I noticed one of my baby Lionheads had a hurt claw, it was bleeding a little, but didn't look that bad to me. He seemed otherwise fine (but prey animals always try and hide it).

    Saturday evening when I went to put him away ( he hangs out on the deck during day) I noticed one of his rear legs seemed to be not working right. His legs were going out from under him and he fell over. By morning it was both hind legs, by noon Sunday it was all four paws and he was getting very distressed. His ears went limp.

    Took him to vet Sunday at 12:30 and they gave him anti-inflammatory and narcotic sedation then did x-rays. No breaks anywhere. Sent him home with anti-inflammatory meds in case it's a soft tissue injury and also I asked for the meds for e-cuniculi. We did not do blood test yet cause it's 150 bucks and the meds were only 23.

    The first night vet told me to wait on the e-cuniculi meds and see how he was doing Monday. But I gave anti-inflammatory Sunday night. He drank water enthusiastically from dropper. I left small amount of pellets in cage and they were gone in the morning. He had moved himself around a few times.

    Monday morning more water, put more pellets in cage. My mom fed him a small amount of kale. By Monday night he had not eliminated in over 24 hrs so I was getting really concerned and vet said if didn't eliminate by Tuesday to consider bringing him back in to put him down. I went ahead and gave him the e-cuniculi meds Monday night because why not... Hail Mary Pass.

    Monday night I hand fed as much kale as he could eat until he got tired and water from dropper. I let him rest awhile, then I did it again before bed.

    Tuesday morning as soon as I started his water he peed a ton and he had pooped quite a bit in the night. I cleaned him and put him on fresh towels. I put papertowels under his bum to absorb anymore pee or poo during the morning.

    His ears and eyes are alert. He's perking his ears up and turning them this way and that when he hears things. He's picking his head up now and trying to sniff and snuffle for food or look at me. He's got motion in all four paws and his tail (he's twitching them and wiggling tail sometimes). He's making movements like he's trying to get his paws under himself to sit up like a normal bunny would. I have him laying against a rolled towel. He eats bits of kale very happily and lots of water. He nibbled a pellet.

    I will go home and check him at lunch. Give more kale/water, hopefully clean up more poo and pee.

    He is moving himself around the cage, but only if he gets startled otherwise he's content to lay pretty still. I have him isolated in a small dog crate with a water bottle as near to him as I could get it and kale/pellets. He's in a cool dark quiet garage.

    Has anyone got similar experience rehabilitating a bunny? He's my seven year old daughter's favorite. Born in July and hand raised. She will be devastated if mom can't fix this so I'm doing everything I can.

    The vet initially said since there was no visible break as long as he'd eat and eliminate we could take a wait and see approach. He said maybe if it was floppy bunny syndrome or soft tissue injury that he had seen bunnies recover. Or if it was the e-cuniculi that we'd just have to see if meds helped.

    Any experience welcome please.

    Thank you so much!
     
  2. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Apr 8, 2013
    Australia
    Ah, jeez, no replies still... I only kept bunnies as a kid, have almost no adult experience or learning about them, but someone's got to reply.

    Ok, stab in the dark... He became progressively paralyzed by the sounds of it, after cutting his foot. If that's causation not just correlation, perhaps he has tetanus or some other bacterial infection that causes paralysis.

    It's also possible it's just correlation, in which case, well, there's so many things that can cause creeping paralysis, and so many of them will respond to any anti-inflammatory that's strong enough, but not necessarily be cured by it.

    Did a search via google for info... Plenty of creeping paralysis cases where the cause was never found. Can be a tumor, rabies, bacterial infection, heavy metal or other toxicity, some plants can cause it, anything that causes acute nerve inflammation basically... Botulism can cause it too but I expect the rabbit would be dead by now if that were the case.

    These I believe are helpful links, below... Not necessarily any solid answers but possibilities to investigate, and people to ask.

    If your vet is not familiar with rabbits, there's potentially a heck of a lot they can be unaware of, since animal disease is a vast and ever evolving field of research in any single species, never mind a whole bunch of them. Many vets are only familiar with a few species, very few comprehensively cover all domestic species. The more information is discovered, the more doctors, scientists and vets are being forced to split off into specialized areas of practice.
    Quote: Quote: Quote: Quote: Lots of good links in that last one too, as well as stories of dealing with permanently damaged rabbits.
    Quote: Quote: Quote: Sorry to spam you with links, but these sites should provide more info and some are forums so you can ask some quite knowledgeable people for further info.

    Best wishes, hope your rabbit recovers.
     
  3. DuckieLover2014

    DuckieLover2014 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 31, 2014
    Missouri
    Poor Bunny.
    I have had several bunnys and never had a issue like this. I hope he is well very soon. Keep us updated on his condition please.
     

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