Anyone ever moved a building?

Discussion in 'Family Life - Stories, Pictures & Updates' started by Chick_a_dee, Nov 30, 2008.

  1. Chick_a_dee

    Chick_a_dee Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 23, 2008
    Peterborough, ON
    We have a 2 horse hackney shed up by the house that is slowly falling apart, because it is a historical part of the farm (dates to 1870), we'd like to move it to a dryer location, pour a pad, and start rebuilding it. Has anyone here have any experience with moving buildings? It's not huge, must be 20x10 or 12, by 10ft high at the most I believe. It is not sunk, the frame is sitting on boulders, and the majority of the structure is okay, not the finished or rafters though.

    Has anyone ever moved a whole building, or taken apart a decaying building and put it back together, etc.

    Input is needed!
     
  2. chiknwhisperer

    chiknwhisperer Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 9, 2008
    Lowell, IN
    That is one heck of a project. All I can think of is lots of support under and around it and flat carts under the corners and possibly the middle and lots of people there to help. It will take lots of time and patience and garefull manuvering I know that much.
     
  3. Chick_a_dee

    Chick_a_dee Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 23, 2008
    Peterborough, ON
    Quote:We were considering talking to the menonites a town over and seeing what they have to say, it's traditional style of building, we also need to pull our driveshed back into line, it's leaning a bit, and were thinking of getting a team in to pull it up or just a farmer and his tractor [​IMG] Most of the frame lumber for the hackney shed is hand milled 10x10 probably maple, cedar, oak, or hemlock.
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2008
  4. brooster

    brooster Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 14, 2007
    northwest Ohio
    do you have a picture of the building?
     
  5. wohneli

    wohneli Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 6, 2008
    Gainesville
    I would recommend getting a professional who specializes in historic preservation. If you try to do this and make a boo-boo someone could get hurt or you could ruin a valuable building. Good luck - pics would be cool
     
  6. Chick_a_dee

    Chick_a_dee Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 23, 2008
    Peterborough, ON
    Quote:Not at the moment, I'm going to take a couple tomorrow.
     
  7. babyboy1_mom

    babyboy1_mom Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 13, 2008
    Louisiana
    We recently moved a building, but nothing that size. We jacked the front of the building up and backed a trailer underneath it and then we
    come-a-longed (sp?) it up onto the trailer. When we got it home, we
    come-a-longed it off of the trailer very slowly. It was approx. 8' x 4.5' and 11'-12' tall.

    Also, while we come-a-longed it up onto the trailer, we put metal pipes underneath the building to help it roll onto the trailer, instead of sliding.

    Good luck
     
  8. Mac in Wisco

    Mac in Wisco Antagonist

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    May 25, 2007
    SW Wisconsin
    I've never tried it... If it's leaning I doubt you could move it intact. I would think if you made good isometric drawings, numbered the components in the drawings, and then numbered the components as per the drawing as you disassembled, you could build it again in another location.
     
  9. Chick_a_dee

    Chick_a_dee Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 23, 2008
    Peterborough, ON
    Quote:Well... all the finishing is rubbish, rotted, and falling off, siding, roofing, flooring all going, hopefully some could be reused, the trusses would be taken out as they're all rotted since the roof is gone, and we'd save the basic frame, which is the 10x10 hand milled lumber. It is pinned together, so we'd take the pins out and replace them afterwards (if any are missing, which I know at least 2 are, they'd be replaced with new ones). We would number/label the pieces, and pull them away with a borrowed draft to their new location, where a pad would be awaiting their arrival. I hit a bump where it comes to attaching them to the pad, as in... they're kind of 10 inches thick, and if it's Hemlock... well, that could be interesting.
     
  10. Chick_a_dee

    Chick_a_dee Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 23, 2008
    Peterborough, ON
    Quote:It's not leaning, the drive shed that would have housed the carriages is leaning, the hackney shed is almost just the frame the finishing wood is all rotted away, but the basic frame is in really good condition.
     

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