Anyone have experience with aggressive dogs?

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by xadika, Apr 20, 2009.

  1. xadika

    xadika Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Last edited: Mar 19, 2012
  2. FlightsofFancy

    FlightsofFancy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Canton, GA
    I have rehabbed dogs like this and it sounds like she is a pretty good dog. However, she is being triggered and that can not be solved on here. It has to be done face to face with an experienced trainer.
    Good luck to you and her!
     
  3. xadika

    xadika Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Last edited: Mar 19, 2012
  4. ohiofarmgirl

    ohiofarmgirl Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 22, 2009
    we took in my dog's littermate (his brother) who was *really* food aggressive and it took over a year to get him over it... its a huge commitment. this isnt at all what you are experiencing but at least our situation worked out so there is hope. we ended up having to 'reparent' the dog and do training from the ground up. it was a lot of work but now he's doing great.

    i think you are doing the right to get professional help... but its ok if this is too much for you right now. dont be afraid to put the safety of your family first.

    let us know how its goes with the trainer - they'll have the best recommendation.
     
  5. hensdeliverthegoods

    hensdeliverthegoods Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My son's Doberman had/has similar problems when we rescued him almost a year ago. He's just now coming around, but still snaps at my husband because my husband is afraid of him and he senses it.

    It takes a minimum of a year to turn a traumatized rescue dog around. You have the added challenge of having a breed that almost always defaults to aggression under stress. I would personally do a bit more to protect your mother until you have this dog under more control.

    You sound like a family that knows what you're doing with dogs. I think that getting a professional trainer is a great idea. With time, training and patience you should be able to get this dog turned around. Just please don't forget to take extra precautions with this dog till you get there. Best of luck! [​IMG]
     
  6. Foxhound lady

    Foxhound lady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    TX baby!
    First you are working with a guarding breed, that is strong willed, tends to be domiant and from my understanding quite stubborn

    You are doing the right thing by getting a professional in to help with the "problems". But you are always going to be wondering in the back of your mind will she do it again and who will she do it do. Some people are not meant for domiant dogs as they are not domiant people. Dogs figure this out faster then most people

    We have a cocker (I now not as big) that have "problems" doesnt like to be told no or disciplined in any manner. His first reaction is to bite. We does all the commands you want him to do( he id highly food motivated). He goes to bed, sits, downs ect. He has already biten my mom, my dad, and attempted one on me. He was on a tummy up down stay for 20 minutes and a reassursation on dominance (no hitting ever) as it just makes things worse.

    Would I trust him around adults possibly around kids defiantly not. Is he a good dog otherwise (except when he's groomed) most defiantly.
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2009
  7. FlightsofFancy

    FlightsofFancy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I am sorry! I didn't mean to sound incensitive. It's just that there are so many ways to rehab a dog and all of them will generally work as long as you are consistant. I have found that posting techniques and ideas usually end up in a debate that leads to no where.
    I have seen dogs like this turn around after basic obedience classes which should give them more confidence. The general rule is never underestimate the dog. Which it sounds like you are not and start with a private trainer, which you are also doing. I think you are headed in the right direction and wish you the very best of luck!
     
  8. redhen

    redhen Kiss My Grits... Premium Member

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    i'd never,EVER have a dog that turned on me...espically a Cane Corso...dogs protecting your house is ONE thing..a dog going after someones face that lives IN the house is a whole 'nother story... *shivers* ..if it were me..and i really wanted a 'guard dog', i'd buy a real trained guard dog, trained from someone that specializes in guard dogs...you only have one face.... [​IMG] best of luck
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2009
  9. Suellyn

    Suellyn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Was a professional animal trainer/zookeeper for past 15+ years, but by no means claim to be an expert on this breed.

    However, I just wanted to say *PLEASE*PLEASE* do not under-estimate the the dangerous potential of this situation.

    Make human safety the #1 priority, ESPECIALLY until you have the Trainer there, face to face, for evaluation. You were very smart to contact a professional, IMHO it is the ONLY option if you are even remotely considering keeping/rehabbing this dog.

    I am by no means saying it is hopeless, I'm not there, so don't know... but there are a lot of SERIOUS red flags here, and this is a breed known to be pretty "hard core" with high potential for aggression. When you add in unknown genetics and a history of abuse, well... that's about as challenging (and potentially voilatile)as it gets.

    Can you call the trainer and speak to her further, for any advice/suggestions (especially human safety related) to get you through til the 29th?

    I hesitate to give any specific advice, but Karen Pryor's book "Don't Shoot The Dog" was required reading for all of my students and interns; it is a great introduction to positive reinforcement behavior management thru "clicker training". Ask your trainer what she thinks of it. (?) I am by NO MEANS suggesting you use this book as a substitute for a Trainer (!!!), but it may be a good "jumping off point" for you and your family.

    Good luck!!!!
     
  10. CatAteBird

    CatAteBird Out Of The Brooder

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    My heart goes out to you.... I have worked with all cases all my life... Every case is different.. Every trainer has a different method.. It's all trial an error really and when it comes to strays.. only by personal experierence... One person has to gain their trust and become the pack leader and slowly introduce them to different situations... It's a long process. But, just like a human/child anything... it takes time.... devotion and common sense... The dog will get over it... But again the only thing I stress for strays that have been abused... One person bonding with the dog... becoming the pack leader and then slowly introducing to the expierences showing that there should be no fear..
     

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