Anyone have tips on first night of baby chicks in brooder

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by GibsonChicks4U, Feb 20, 2014.

  1. GibsonChicks4U

    GibsonChicks4U Out Of The Brooder

    69
    0
    39
    Feb 20, 2014
    Porter Texas
    Hello guys, ness to this , I seem to be worrying about whether my chicks will get too hot at night just got 15. Rhode Island reds, any tips for their first night in the brooder , and am I worrying too much about them?
     
  2. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

    90-95 degrees for the first week of life and decrease by 5 degrees per week until fully feathered around 6 weeks, even on the head. (Temp. recommendations for chicks.)

    It can be warmer than this under the bulb but make sure they have room to get away from the heat at the other end of the brooder. Watch the chicks - if they are huddled together under the light they are cold...if they are as far as possible away from the light they are too hot (or panting). If they are in a circle around the light that is perfect (or scattered throughout the brooder, talking and eating/drinking).

    I hope this helps!
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2014
  3. PimentoPlymouth

    PimentoPlymouth Chillin' With My Peeps

    147
    10
    91
    Mar 9, 2012
    Just watch your chicks I dont pay to much attention to the temp after the inital setup just watch the chicks and how they act. As stated before if they are all scattered out away from the light and seem to be panting then its to low. If they seem to be huddled together directly underneath all the time then lower some. Raise a little every week and youll be fine. Take more time to enjoy their fluff while its there and worry less :)
     
  4. GibsonChicks4U

    GibsonChicks4U Out Of The Brooder

    69
    0
    39
    Feb 20, 2014
    Porter Texas
    I work throughout the day from 8 to. 5 any suggestions in the heating part? It's hard to watch them while at worl
     
  5. PimentoPlymouth

    PimentoPlymouth Chillin' With My Peeps

    147
    10
    91
    Mar 9, 2012
    is the brooder inside the house or a room that stays around the same temperature throughtout the day.
     
  6. Sonya9

    Sonya9 Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,250
    145
    191
    Feb 7, 2014
    Jones County, Georgia
    If it were me I would make sure the brooder is big enough to have a significant temperature gradient, 90 to 95 on one side and at least 15 or so degrees lower on the other side. Since you can't watch them and monitor them for most of the day they need to be able to control the amount of heat as needed.

    I have mine in a 2.5 foot long wire dog crate. Heat lamp is on one end, I use an indoor/outdoor thermometer to monitor the temp on both sides of the brooder. It is running a bit high on the warm side in this photo but you get the idea. The heat lamp is in the back close to the water.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2014
  7. GibsonChicks4U

    GibsonChicks4U Out Of The Brooder

    69
    0
    39
    Feb 20, 2014
    Porter Texas
    It's in a room that stays decent have the AC set for 76 in house and have their heat lamp on them they were all up eating and drinking when I got up
     
  8. GibsonChicks4U

    GibsonChicks4U Out Of The Brooder

    69
    0
    39
    Feb 20, 2014
    Porter Texas
    [​IMG]
     
  9. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

    x2 If they can get away from the heat they will be OK and you don't have to worry about them overheating.

    Just make sure you have the waterers and feeders set up so that the shavings don't clog them up and they can't eat or drink. I find that putting the waterer up on bricks (with a brick next to it for them to step up to drink) works well at keeping shavings out. Of course if you elevate things they need a step up so they can reach it.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2014
  10. The Lazy L

    The Lazy L Chillin' With My Peeps

    739
    64
    148
    Dec 16, 2011
    1868
    What ChickensAreSweet said.

    Given them space to they can more closer or away from they heat. They are smart enough to know when they are cold or too hot.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by