Anyone know what exactly an "Arabic chicken" is? Here's a photo.

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by desertchook, Jan 18, 2015.

  1. desertchook

    desertchook New Egg

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    Jan 18, 2015
    I have just started to raise chickens in the United Arab Emirates. We live in a coastal desert where summer temperatures reach 120 degrees and 70 percent humidity. In the past we have raised Rhode Island Reds and related crosses in the US and the UK. However, this time we opted to start with "local Arabic chickens" because they were reputed to be better able to survive the summer heat and harsh climate. I have no idea what to expect from these hens in terms of laying, personality, etc. Does anyone have any idea what breed or combination of breeds a "local Arabic chicken" might be? Welcome your thought. Here's a photo of one of my hens:

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Maebh

    Maebh Out Of The Brooder

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    I have no idea, my first reaction was to crack a joke about chickpeas and cardamon and orange blossom water.

    I think it looks beautiful. Do you have many? Do they look like a standard breed? or is it more a barnyard type mix?
     
  3. desertchook

    desertchook New Egg

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    Jan 18, 2015
    Hi Maebh. Thanks for your reply.

    I have 4 hens. They were purchased at a local livestock/bird market - which like most things here is largely disorganized, unregulated and operated by people who don't speak English. So, I have no information about their lineage. They were described as "local chicken" or "Arabic chicken" so, I assume they are a local "barnyard" hen - probably the offspring of random crosses of chickens that have survived the conditions here. I was just curious to know if anyone had come across this kind of hen before, or if the coloring/conformation gave any clues to their heritage. This might be a case of "wait and see" as the hens mature. The hens are smaller in size (but not bantam) and they have just started laying small, 40gram eggs that are lightly tinted. They seem relatively friendly and not too noisy. So far so good.
     
  4. BantamFan4Life

    BantamFan4Life LOOK WHAT YOU MADE ME DO. Premium Member

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    I'm not sure what an "Arabic Chicken" is. I'm only familiar with breeds in the North America. However, I would recommend looking through the breeds listed on "FeatherSite", they may have it.
     
  5. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    I haven't heard of Arabic chickens. But, I'm not that familiar with most breeds foreign to the United States or the United Kingdom.
     
  6. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    I'll bet they're scrappy and hardy as anything.
     
  7. keesmom

    keesmom Overrun With Chickens

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    I agree. You are in a harsh climate. Any birds than can survive there, thrive and reproduce should do well for you. Unfortunately it will be difficult to determine what breeds are in her lineage.
     
  8. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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  9. desertchook

    desertchook New Egg

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    Jan 18, 2015
    Thank you for your replies. It was curiosity more than anything else that led me to ask about the lineage of my hens. The bird market sells these "Arabic chickens" for a fraction of the price of the "other" more expensive kind - which they call "Fancy chickens." The Fancy chickens include what appear to be the crested or frizzled breeds which would appeal to the exotic pet market here. According to the fellow that sold me the "Arabic chickens," these "Fancy chickens" need special coops with air conditioning to survive the summer heat. So, we opted to go for the chicken that is best equipped to deal with the conditions here. Our goal is to have happy chickens - and to teach our young children something about taking care of animals. Thank you all for your input!
     

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