Anyone use Grizzly Salmon Oil?

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by gritsar, Dec 13, 2009.

  1. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    The link won't work, but here's what Jeffers Pet says about it:

    All-natural, heart-healthy dog food supplement. Made from 100% pure salmon oil, it contains nature's balanced blend of over 15 Omega-3 & Omega-6 Fatty Acids. These fatty acids are known to help strengthen the heart and are proven to help maintain your dog's healthy skin and beautiful coat. Add daily to your dog's food. 1-25 lb: 1 pump, 25-50 lb: 2 pumps & over 50 lb: 3 pumps.

    I'm considering adding it to Jax's (GSD) food. Our house is very dry in the wintertime, even with a humidifier and I'm starting to notice that even Jax is showing the effects of it.

    Would like feedback. TIA
     
  2. Cara

    Cara Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 30, 2007
    NM
    My Bloodhound is on an array of supplements for her Wobblers. She takes fish oil twice a day to help keep the inflammation down, and I started giving a little to the rest of our dogs too. The improvement in their coat is amazing, I didn't think they looked bad before but I can certainly see an improvement.

    I found that capsules are more economical for a large dog, but they do have to be good quality. I use one with a blend of sardine, mackerel and anchovy body oils (not liver) and she gets seven 1200mg capsules per day (at a dosage of 20mg/lb of EPA). She likes them, in fact they all hunt for them in their food to eat first. For general health you probably wouldn't need to give as much, I give the others one twice a day.

    She also has extra virgin coconut oil (which she loves), Nupro, Ark Naturals Joint Rescue, MSM and Duralactin [​IMG]
     
  3. Grace

    Grace Out Of The Brooder

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    I use it as part of my raw feeding. All my dogs get it. I am very pleased with the results. It is kinda pricey but the quality is worth the extra money . If you do supplement with it make sure to add viatmin E to their diet or if you feed kibble make sure there is vitamin E in it. A quality omega supplement to can depleat the body of its vitamin E reserves. Vitamin E stablizes the oil molecules.

    Hope that helped. [​IMG]
     
  4. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Thanks to both of you. [​IMG]
     
  5. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Grace, I sent you a PM. [​IMG]
     
  6. Crazyland

    Crazyland Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 14, 2009
    Sandhills NC
    We use it also with the Vit E.
    I have not found a better one than Grizzly that has a reasonable price.
     
  7. Wynette

    Wynette Moderator Staff Member

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    I don't feed this, but I DO feed Omega 3,6,9 in capsule form to my canines.
     
  8. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

    28,907
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    SW Arkansas
    Actually I emailed the company and they said that supplementing with Vitamin E is not necessary. This is what they sent me:

    Grizzly Pet Products Fact Sheet

    4 oz 8 oz 16 oz 32 oz
    Bottle Size 118 ml 237 ml 447 ml 948 ml
    Pump Size 0.07 oz .07 oz 0.12 oz 0.12 oz
    1840 mg 1840 mg 3220 mg 3220 mg
    **1 cc = 920 mg of oil 2 cc 2 cc 3.5 cc 3.5 cc
    Approximate Pumps 57 114 133 267
    Omega-3 535 mg 535 mg 935 mg 935 mg
    DHA (600 per teaspoon) 220 mg 220 mg 385 mg 385 mg
    EPA (450 per teaspoon) 165 mg 165 mg 290 mg 290 mg
    Omega-6 55 mg 55 mg 95 mg 95 mg

    4 oz 8 oz 16 oz 32 oz
    Protein - Pure oil 0 0 0 0
    Calories (255/ounce) 18 18 30 30
    Fat Grams 1.9 1.9 3.25 3.25
    Vitamin A - 10 - 12 mg/kg 0.02024 0.02024 0.03542 0.03542
    Vitamin D - 120 - 140 mg-kg 0.2392 0.2392 0.4186 0.4186
    Vitamin E - 70 - 120 mg/kg 0.1748 0.1748 0.3059 0.3059
    pH - Fatty acids do not have a measurable pH
     
  9. Grace

    Grace Out Of The Brooder

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    I'm definetly no health expert but my opinion still remains that dogs need extra vitamin E. when being given any PUFA(Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid) 70-120 IU/doses is too variable for me. I use the vit. E to also protect the PUFAs which are seceptiable to degradation. The body WILL use up the vitamin E reserves in processing the the oil. My dogs however are very active working dogs fed a raw diet with no kibble to get vitamin E. So this has a lot to do with why I will continue to alway add Vit. E to the Salmon oil. There is still much research being done in this area.

    "Vitamin E:
    Vitamin E is an important nutrient which has been shown to have a number of physiologic and pharmacologic effects. It in a potent antioxidant and reduces fat oxidation and increases the production of HDL cholesterol. At higher doses, it also reduces cyclooxygenase and lipooxygenase activities, decreasing production of prostaglandins and leukotreines. As such, it is a potent anti-inflammatory drug. It will reduce platelet function and prolong the bleeding time slightly in healthy individuals. There is no known side-effects to vitamin E at levels less than 4000-6000 IU per day (except in cats, where levels >100 IU/day can create hepatolipidosis). I recommend that vitamin E be given to all dogs. For dogs under 2 years of age, give 400 IU of vitamin E daily. For dogs over 2 years of age, give 800 IU of vitamin E daily. "
    -from R.M. Clemmons, DVM, PhD Associate Professor of Neurology & Neurosurgery Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences

    Vitamin E

    Vitamin E is the third of the fat soluble vitamins. Foods rich in Vitamin E include plant oils such as safflower and wheat germ. As with the other fat soluble vitamins, Vitamin E is also highly concentrated in meats such as liver and fat. All of the functions of Vitamin E are not known, but it plays a role in the formation of cell membranes, cell respiration, and in the metabolism of fats. It is an antioxidant and protects various hormones from oxidation.

    Deficiencies of Vitamin E will cause cell damage and death in skeletal muscle, heart, testes, liver, and nerves. It is essential in keeping the cells of these organs alive and functioning. Vitamin E deficiencies have been well documented in both dogs and cats. The 'Brown Bowel Syndrome' is the condition usually used to describe a dog or cat suffering from inadequate Vitamin E. These animals have affected bowels which ulcerate, hemorrhage, and degenerate. In addition, the cells of the eyes and testes can also be affected.

    There is no experimental evidence to support the popular belief that Vitamin E in excess will help increase the stamina in breeding dogs or cats. Vitamin E is occasionally supplemented for this reason, but it is ineffective.

    There are no known Vitamin E toxicities in the dog and cat. Fed even at huge levels, no interruption of bodily functions has been demonstrated. Recommendations on the daily dose are highly variable depending on the source. Further research is necessary to discover other possible functions of Vitamin E.
    http://www.dogfoodproject.com/index.php?page=vitamins

    Research defintetly continues to grow in this area and there seems to be many diferent ideas in this area and no concrete facts on dosage . Except there have been no toxicities in dogs.

    Just some of my thoughts on the subject... [​IMG]
     
  10. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

    28,907
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    Nov 9, 2007
    SW Arkansas
    Thanks for that info. Grace.
    We haven't started Jax on the supplements yet.
    My shipment arrived and I immediately had to hide the bottle. My cat wants to eat it. [​IMG]
     

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