Anything you wish your vet could do?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by kbackel88, Oct 1, 2011.

  1. kbackel88

    kbackel88 Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi all,

    I created a small thread earlier about what you thought of having access to a poultry veterinarian. I was hoping you could all help me design some of my poultry club's activities by letting me know what kind of things you wish your vet could do. By this I mean, are their specific problems you often see that would require veterinary aid? I would like specific input so that I can focus on activities that would be beneficial to you all. Thanks so much!
     
  2. Pharm Girl

    Pharm Girl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm squeamish about chopping heads off if they get seriously sick or injured. I'd like to have a place to euthanize sick/injured chickens, because I'm a wuss and they are my pets, not just poultry. Second, I think I have one starting to get bumblefoot and it would be nice to be able to get a second opinion and treatment if necessary. I'm not such a wuss about that, and will cut it out if I have to, but taking it in would be easier!
     
  3. stoopid

    stoopid Chicken Fairy Godmother

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    House calls. They do it with horses, but not chickens.
     
  4. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Quote:If you suspect bumblefoot and want a second opinion by a vet, are you prepared to PAY what that vet tells you? A simple YES or NO? (AND that's NOT including the surgery or giving you meds) Post a photo here and you'll get plenty of input for FREE!!!!!
    Edited to add: Just trying to save you money!
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2011
  5. theoldchick

    theoldchick The Chicken Whisperer

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    I want my poultry vet to be able to caponize, perform laceration repair, crop surgery, splint fracture legs, beak repair, and be current on vaccination protocol for a particular area.

    This is going to be a controversial subject as some folks think it's silly to spend money on a chicken. The one thing I like about veterinary medicine is animal care is constantly improving. I remember 30 years ago when folks thought it was silly to spend money on a cat. Replacing a sick cat was the common thought back then. Hip and elbow replacement was unheard of. Dental care was prehistoric. But as our society advanced so did our desire to provide better care for our pets. We now want to help our geriatric pets age gracefully instead of euthanizing them when they are simply old.

    Since clients demand better care for dogs, cat, birds, pocket pets and now backyard poultry, the veterinary field has grown. Remember, you, as a client will determine the evolution of veterinary care for your pets. Most pet owners do not think of their wards as throwaway pets, and are demanding better care for finned, furred and feathered friends. Thanks to demanding owners, pets are living longer and healthier lives.

    A few years ago I had to have surgery on my horse. Poor gelding had bladder stones. He required general anesthesia at UGA and a week stay at the equine hospital. The money could have been used to buy another horse. But I would never be able to find another horse with a quiet temperament like Bigshot. His kind are far and few. 20 years ago he would have been euthanized. Which would have been a shame since his problem was so fixable.

    In the future I hope to see more veterinarians exposed to the concept of treating pet poultry. And I hope to see more pet chicken owners demanding better care for their birds. When one of my hens recently fractured her leg, I was very pleased to be able to splint her leg, and help her return to a normal life. I didn't simply toss her in freezer camp as she was not purchased for food. Every time I see her race after a piece of bread, I get a sense of satisfaction that I was able to keep her alive. I was able to help her and she gives me eggs.

    Yes, I hope to see more veterinary students exposed to pet poultry care. I recommend clients to stand up for their pet chickens, ducks, turkeys, and ask their vet to treat these pets.

    Speak up and be heard.
     
  6. kbackel88

    kbackel88 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you so much for the encouraging words! I truly appreciate your input as well.

    For those of you who do not feel the need to use the veterinarian, that is understandable as there is great information on this site an a ton of knowledgeable and experienced people. However, it can be difficult to sort through the responses, and there may be some problems that require professional attention whether or not you seek it. The point of this thread is not if you should use a veterinarian or not, it was to understand situation in which you would want to. Some people may feel it is not necessary beyond fulfilling state requirements for vaccinations but other may feel it necessary, especially when poultry become pets. So please do not post if you feel you do not need vet, but DO post if you think of something you would use the vet for!

    Thanks. [​IMG]
     
  7. Pharm Girl

    Pharm Girl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:If you suspect bumblefoot and want a second opinion by a vet, are you prepared to PAY what that vet tells you? A simple YES or NO? (AND that's NOT including the surgery or giving you meds) Post a photo here and you'll get plenty of input for FREE!!!!!
    Edited to add: Just trying to save you money!

    My dog has been to the vet 5 times in the last month for a dog bite which lead to a ruptured seroma, so the answer is YES. I know that wouldn't be true for everyone and I will try to fix what I can at home, but there are some things that I would be willing to consult the professionals on. That said, the cost would have to be reasonable. I know there are vets that charge $500 for a simple check up and shots, where as mine charge about $50. Gotta shop around!
     
  8. macdoogle2

    macdoogle2 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a wonderful avian Vet in this area and I have over the last few years spent alot of money in his clinic treating my Cockatiels. I love my chickens but have a different atitude torward them. Maybe it's because I can go in a store and buy poultry. I eat chicken just not my own. When I hatched a chick with a broken leg I called the Vet to see if He could just take a look. If he could fix the leg I would be happy to pay. The receptionist said it would be 56 dollars to just take that look. Keep in mind this was a barnyard mix chick. The kind you could get from a feed store for 2-3 dollars. No idea if it was going to be a hen or a roo. If the latter I would not be able to keep it anyway. It seemed like to much money to spend on one little chick. Turned out the chick was a hen. I just had to put her down at 27 weeks when she could no longer stand on her one good leg. Broke my heart. I now feel that 56 dollars would have been well spend back then. Vet did offer to put her down for me for 80 dollars .I dont mind paying high vet prices. Veterinary school is harder to get into then Med school. I've paid high Vet prices for things because I want to keep local Vets in business for when I really need them. I just feel sometimes a Vet needs to 'just take a look' without charging. Kind of like a free estimate. I think the Vet would actually get more business that way and happier clients.
     

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