apple cider vinegar

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by logansterling, Sep 17, 2009.

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  1. logansterling

    logansterling Out Of The Brooder

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    I read in the turkey section that you can use apple cider vinegar to worm turkeys. Can you also use it for chickens? If so how much do I mix in with their water?
     
  2. fordmommy

    fordmommy Dancing With My Chickens

    Jul 16, 2009
    Wisconsin
    I mix 1-2 Tbsp to 1 gallon of water. They love it. [​IMG]
     
  3. logansterling

    logansterling Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 2, 2009
    Awesome thanks!!!
     
  4. fordmommy

    fordmommy Dancing With My Chickens

    Jul 16, 2009
    Wisconsin
    [​IMG]
     
  5. wjallen05

    wjallen05 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    North Georgia
    cool thanks! I had never heard of this.
     
  6. NYREDS

    NYREDS Overrun With Chickens

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    Jan 14, 2008
    Please explain how a tiny amount of vinegar added to a gallon of water would kill worms in a turkey or anything else.
     
  7. vnploveschickens

    vnploveschickens Chillin' With My Peeps

    Don't use ACV in metal waterers. The acid leaches the metals into the water. Not good.

    Use plastic waters.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. NYREDS

    NYREDS Overrun With Chickens

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    Apple cider vinegar at full strength is at 5% acidity-how acidic would a gallon of water with a tablespoon of vinegar added be?
     
  9. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Ontario, Canada
    Quote:You can calculate it, you know. Google for the calculation methods. Vinegar is acetic acid, generally 5% by volume. Or just *do* it, and measure. Note that adding a tsp of lemon juice per quart of insufficiently-acidic tomatoes makes them acidic enough for safe waterbath canning, so clearly that sort of ratio DOES have a discernable effect on pH.

    I do not know what good the calculation would do without knowing at what pH the heavy metal ions in galvanized coatings become solubilized, though.

    People (generally harder to poison than chickens) have been seriously poisoned simply by drinking lemonade stored overnight in galvanized containers. Similar problems have arisen with fairly-acid natural sources of water in galvanized troughs. So it is not like you need concentrated sulfuric acid for problems to arise.

    Pat
     
  10. logansterling

    logansterling Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 2, 2009
    thanks for the tip about metal waterers... we do use plastic but that will be good knowledge to store!!!
     
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