Are Cochin's less susceptible to predation?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by kla37, Jun 18, 2010.

  1. kla37

    kla37 Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,163
    11
    173
    Apr 18, 2010
    Hillsborough, NC USA
    I am just getting started with my first flock, and have 3 standard cochin chicks. A five week partridge and two 2 week old blues. Some people have told me that their overly large appearance is a deterrent to predation by hawks and owls. Anyone found this to be true? And how were your cochins as chicks? My baby cochins, although they are the biggest in the brooders, are kind of scardy cats! Any tips on getting them to "open up" more?
     
  2. aerosmith_99

    aerosmith_99 Out Of The Brooder

    Standard Cochins have a large appearance but I am not sure about it protecting them from predators. We use to have large breed ducks that owls would attack and eat down into their ribcage. You also have to be wary of fox, coyote, etc. My pens are 6' high with wire covering the entire pen. As far as their opening up more, mine are very shy even as adults they have a peaceful attitude. We have a broody female that will let you rub her and lift her from the nest without too much fuss. What colors of cochins did you get?
     
  3. kla37

    kla37 Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,163
    11
    173
    Apr 18, 2010
    Hillsborough, NC USA
    I have 2 partridge ones, 5 weeks old, and 3 blue or blue splash ones, 2 weeks old. Also got some Australorps and Barred Plymouth Rocks. I wanted the other chickens for eggs, but I wanted the cochins just because they are SO cute and fluffy! Hoping at least one of them will turn out to be a lap bird! 16 birds in all, but 7 are going to a friend in a few weeks. I did build a really nice coop and run. The entire setup is roofed, and the run is 8 ft by 12. I fenced it with 1/2 inch hardware cloth all over, even in the bottom under the layer of topsoil and pine shavings. I really wanted to keep critters out and have a roof to protect from raptors. I do want to let them out for a couple hours every late afternoon so they can wander the yard with us or with the dog for protection. We have a really high privacy fence, but we are surrounded by woods, so it kind of worries me!
     
  4. aerosmith_99

    aerosmith_99 Out Of The Brooder

    I let mine out as well when I am outside in the afternoon. I do this mainly to keep an eye on them and make sure they stay out of our flowers and plants that will make them sick.
     
  5. Steve_of_sandspoultry

    Steve_of_sandspoultry Overrun With Chickens

    I would think Cochins would be easy prey since due to all the feathers on the legs they aren't very fast.
     
  6. Steve_of_sandspoultry

    Steve_of_sandspoultry Overrun With Chickens

    Quote:Hey Aerosmith, I bet we use the same feed mill Onslow feed & grain. [​IMG]

    Steve
     
  7. Msbear

    Msbear Fancy Banties

    4,591
    30
    266
    May 8, 2008
    Sharpsburg, MD.
    Quote:I'd have to agree... though being a good runner isn't always effective either.. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2010
  8. WestKnollAmy

    WestKnollAmy The Crazy Chicken Lady

    10,061
    203
    361
    Apr 22, 2008
    upstate SC
    I haven't found any problems with having the standard Cochins. They are not near the woods but the hawks or owls do not seem to be drawn to them. They do not stand guard any better than some of the other breeds. I haven't seen a fox try to take one but my other thinner looking birds go missing. I have some Cochin girls that are huge looking but I bet that would not stop a coyote or even the neighbor's dog.
     
  9. aerosmith_99

    aerosmith_99 Out Of The Brooder

    Quote:Hey Aerosmith, I bet we use the same feed mill Onslow feed & grain. [​IMG]

    Steve

    Steve you are right! I go to onslow feed and grain about once a week buying feed. Do you still have your standard cochins? You don't know anyone that has standard buffs do you?
     
  10. kipper

    kipper Chillin' With My Peeps

    Our Cochins are so sweet, and are big babies. They panic and lose their cool very easy, also at the bottom of the pecking order. Our lowest ranking EE is dominant over them.

    If the preditor is big enough, it may try to take them. We have covered pens and we have Bald Eagles. I have witnessed Eagles drop down into the water and fly off with HUGE salmon, 10lbs and larger. If they can do that, the Cochins, even my giant ones, are at risk.

    Maybe some range shelters where they can hide would be useful?
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by