are dirty eggs a problem?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by cupman, Feb 1, 2012.

  1. cupman

    cupman Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,543
    41
    171
    Apr 12, 2011
    Portland, OR
    I have some eggs that have a little mud on them. The weather has been rainy and their run has been a disaster. They have to pass through the run to get to the nest boxes so some of the eggs have been getting gross.

    Will this affect them much? Should I try to scrape it all off or does that risk rubbing off the oils and other protective stuff that you want?
     
  2. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    This is a choice.

    Some folks just scrape off the big chunks, don't refrigerate and only wash, perhaps, at the time of use.
    Other folks wash every egg and then refrigerate. Either driven by their own sensibilities or that of their customers, they wash their eggs. (using very warm water, and sometimes recommended solutions).

    If eggs get eaten within a few weeks, the entire issue is vastly over blown, in my opinion, as to which is "better". It's merely a choice.
     
  3. cupman

    cupman Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,543
    41
    171
    Apr 12, 2011
    Portland, OR
    Oops! I'm sorry, I wasn't clear. I meant for egg fertility and incubation, not consumption. Thank you, though.
     
  4. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    There have been studies done. Egg sanitation or cleaning and fertility/development rates in hatching. Google it and you'll get a couple great studies, usually done by the industry or in conjunction with a State University Ag extension and research. Obviously, the industry wants the highest rates of hatch for economic profitability.

    The results? A slight nod toward sanitation.

    The hatcheries all wash all their setting eggs all the time. Period. They are in it for the profits and maximizing hatch rates. Interestingly, though, hatching unwashed eggs doesn't seem to increase failure rates at astounding proportions as some might think. Try batch one way and try another batch another and judge your own results.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2012
  5. tmoore8595

    tmoore8595 Chillin' With My Peeps

    380
    13
    114
    Nov 7, 2010
    Jefferson County, Al.
    I try to select eggs that are not terribly dirty for hatching, but some dirt doesn't usually cause any problems. Broody hens usually have pretty good hatch rates and they don't wash their eggs.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by