are green eyes good/preffered?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by CochinBrahmaLover, Mar 3, 2012.

  1. the only reason im asking this is once i remember some one was all happy most of their flock has green eyes. I have 2 cochins (or more) with green eyes, and if they are good are they preffered? and if they are prefferred if i sell their chicks will they be worth more? I dont care much about the chick question but i was wondering.


    THANKS IN ADVANCE
     
  2. Debbi

    Debbi Overrun With Chickens

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    It would all depend on what the Standard of Perfection states the eye color should be, for the given breed. I don't know what color Cochins should have, but if they have green eyes, and the SOP calls for dark brown or black, then the ones with the green eyes should be pulled from the breeding program. Green eyes in this case would be a "Disqualifying Fault", and not something you want to pass on.
     
  3. OK thank you,


    oh and I am not a serious breeder (for now... :p) I just like to cram as much chicken facts in my head when i can
     
  4. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    It all depends on the breed and the age of the breed.

    As of Cochins I believe that all variates should have Red-ish Bay eyes.



    Chris
     
  5. oh dang, all of my cochins have green eyes [​IMG] Note to self: dont get hatchery birds
     
  6. Debbi

    Debbi Overrun With Chickens

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    As the other poster said, it depends on the age of the birds. Are we talking full grown birds, or chicks here with your birds?? I have Marans, and most of my chicks have a greyish/green eye, some up until 5 months old. They then turn reddish bay color as they get older. Yes, hatcheries are not the best place to shop if you want birds that adhere to their SOP. Just remember, it takes just as much time, money, and energy to raise quality stock, as it does raising poor or mediocre stock! [​IMG]
     
  7. ya, chicks, 5 weeks, guess ill wait

    ya i am not trying to raise a SOP flock, but i want to show and not have horrible birds
     
  8. Debbi

    Debbi Overrun With Chickens

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    Well, that makes a huge difference! At 5 weeks, unless they have obvious DQs, it is really way too soon to tell anything about their future potential. If you want to show in the future, your birds WILL have to conform to the breed standard! If they don't, you will be wasting a lot of time and money trying to show culls. Get a copy of your breed standard, and read it, read it, read it!!
     

  9. lol, sorry i never knew age changed their eye color when they got older
    I dont show seriously, just for fun, but when i get older i want to, i bet im half the age you think i am.. [​IMG] most people dont realize im so young XD
     
  10. Debbi

    Debbi Overrun With Chickens

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    Nothing against youths here! There are plenty of "old folks" that are still learning and even just beginning too, me included! We all have to start somewhere, so ask all the questions you can. There a lot of really knowlegable folks here on BYC!! Lots of other things can change with age on chickens, other animals too. Hold onto your better birds for as long as you can, because they can change drastically in appearance over several week's time. The most important thing is to get a copy of your breed's SOP (Standard of Perfection) and memorize it! That way you can tell what they should look like, and then you can decide who to keep and who to let go. I see you are in Alaska? It may be harder to find a reputable breeder up there, but there are quite a few folks here on BYC from Alaska. Find a Chochin thread on BYC, and ask around. Look through the pics on the thread(s) to see what other people's birds look like. Who knows, there may be a breeder right down the road from you!
     

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