Are Magpies beneficial?

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by minnehaha, Nov 25, 2014.

  1. minnehaha

    minnehaha Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a lot of magpies and crows (usually not at the same time) that visit our property.

    I am wondering if Magpies chase hawks and or owls away like the crows do?
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2014
  2. cackleberrycam

    cackleberrycam Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I do not find magpie's beneficial for two reasons:

    1. Magpies are a wild bird which means that it is possible that they can give your hens lice. ( I think this is what happened to my hens when they got lice because the only wild birds that they came in contact with were magpies.)

    2. The magpies around my house eat my chicken's eggs! This is REALLY annoying!

    As for giving protection from hawks, I do not know...
     
  3. minnehaha

    minnehaha Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Had not thought about lice, I've been lucky then because not only are Magpies and crows ever present, but wild turkeys are always flying over the fence and feeding with my chickens. The rooster chases them out, but they keep coming back, eventually my rooster gets tired and simply keeps himself between his hens and the turkeys.

    The magpies do eat eggs here. Our chickens lay in the hen house, but the ducks sometimes lay outside the hen house. The auto door opens at first light, so they go out, if they have not laid their eggs yet, they will lay it outside. If I'm not quick, the magpies get them.

    Still wondering if there are ANY benefits, because they aren't going anywhere.....[​IMG]
     
  4. gawildlife

    gawildlife Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Don't know magpies as we don't have them here but I'm automatically suspect of any omnivorous opportunistic species. Many like raccoons and crows are highly adaptable and pretty high on the logic scale for animals. Meaning if they ever realize a way to gain an advantage at my expense they will be more difficult to deter. I would error on the side of caution and try to prevent any interaction from the start before they learn of any advantages.

    For instance if I had coons in the area I would not wait until I lost a bird to take action because then you have a coon that comes back for a meal. Instead I would start with deterrents to prevent coons from ever learning hens are tasty. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
     
  5. minnehaha

    minnehaha Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Surprisingly as it is, we do not have any known raccoons in the area. We've never seen one in person, nor have we seen any on our 5 game cameras. None of our neighbors have seen one either,


    I agree with you wholehearted that you never want to educate a predator.

    I like the crows, but wish I knew more about those noisy obnoxious ever present Magpies!
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2014
  6. chickengeorgeto

    chickengeorgeto Overrun With Chickens

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    Everything is useful.... somehow. Even your Crows and Magpies are beneficial, if for nothing more than to keep corn prices high.
     
  7. minnehaha

    minnehaha Chillin' With My Peeps

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    LOLOLOL....So true so true! If I find a magPie benefit, I'll be sure and post it!

    I do like my crows though, the hawks are very afraid of them!
     
  8. Naser

    Naser Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No
     
  9. minnehaha

    minnehaha Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Any reason why?
     
  10. Naser

    Naser Chillin' With My Peeps

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    They eat eggs, they kill small birds, they transmit diseases, I have never seen them chasing away any big bird
     

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