Are my duck eggs safe to eat?

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by Daglebagel, Jun 14, 2019.

  1. Daglebagel

    Daglebagel In the Brooder

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    Is there anything that would make my duck eggs UNSAFE to eat? She has laid 3 so far, the first one was smaller than a ping pong ball, the next two much bigger. Basic feed diet with plenty of snacks like herbs, grapes, blueberries, grass. They forage in the 8x16 run (3 ducks total).

    We have not gotten them any shots and I have never eaten duck eggs before, but I am a former chef and would love to take advantage of them!
     
  2. Texas Kiki

    Texas Kiki Egg Pusher

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    EAT them!
    There is no reason why you shouldn't.


    Congratulations!
     
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  3. Texas Kiki

    Texas Kiki Egg Pusher

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    PS. Ducks don't get 'regular' shots like say a dog would. ;)
     
  4. Duckworth

    Duckworth Songster

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    My husband and son eat our duck eggs every day. There is no reason not to. They are especially good in baked goods. We use them one-to-one in place of chicken eggs. I fry them every morning and make quiche, omelets, frittatas, etc. We also hard boil them. The yolks don’t get the dry consistency of a hard-boiled chicken egg, but retain a creamier texture.

    Because winter will come and our ducks will slow way down on laying, we also put our excess eggs into silicon soap molds and freeze them for the winter. I have a mold with six heart-shaped molds that are just the right size for a single duck egg. I cut into the yolk with a knife before freezing to reduce the changes in consistency that happen to the frozen yolks. Thawed, they are as useful as fresh eggs for anything that uses them as beaten or scrambled eggs.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2019
  5. chickens really

    chickens really Crazy Call Duck Momma

    The only reason not to eat them is Salmonella risk..
    Definitely you can eat them. I don't because I don't like the texture of the eggs..:sick...
     
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  6. room onthebroom

    room onthebroom Animal-a-holic

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    @Daglebagel

    Definitely eat them. I use mine mostly for baking & they are hands down the best! I'm actually not sure I'll ever be able to bake with just a plain old chicken egg ever again. :p
    We give a lot of ours away because people want them, but they're very expensive to buy at our farmers market. They're a little too rich for my taste just fried in a pan, but I think I'm in the minority with that because 90% of the people we give them to love them & eat them that way. My neighbor says we should sell them, but the look on peoples faces when you give them some is priceless! :love
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2019
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  7. room onthebroom

    room onthebroom Animal-a-holic

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    Thanks for this info! I always wanted to freeze eggs, but wasn't sure if it would change the water content. Have you noticed a difference? Also, how do you thaw them? :pop
     
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  8. Miss Lydia

    Miss Lydia Loving this country life

    Oh boy brownies are the best with duck eggs!! And even with any poultry eggs there is a risk of Salmonella. You just use safe conditions just like with handling all food.
     
  9. YodaBat

    YodaBat Chirping

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    Eat Them!
     
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  10. Duckworth

    Duckworth Songster

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    This is the first year I am freezing eggs, but everyone I’ve seen discuss it has said that they have great success with it. That’s where the suggestion to puncture the yolks came from. I’ve even seen where people who separated their eggs before freezing and were able to whip the thawed egg whites into meringue. I intend to thaw mine overnight in the refrigerator, though I have heard of people doing it in the microwave. I probably wouldn’t have good success with that.
     
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