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Are There any non-crowing rooster breeds?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Atrayu, Aug 31, 2011.

  1. Atrayu

    Atrayu Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 12, 2011
    Hermosa, South Dakota
    I have been thinking about getting a rooster, but my family really doesn't want me to, because of the crowing. Does anyone know if there is a breed of non-crowing roosters or at least roosters who whisper crow? [​IMG] or even breeds that crow very little.
    I am new at this and just wondering.
    thanks in advance
     
  2. no. every rooster crows, and each indivisual rooster will have their own unique crow.

    how ever, Bantam breeds have smaller voice boxes which means their crows will be quieter.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2011
  3. Atrayu

    Atrayu Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 12, 2011
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    thank you! That is good to know. I guess no rooster for my gals! [​IMG]
     
  4. OlyChickenGuy

    OlyChickenGuy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 5, 2010
    Olympia, Washington
    You CAN train your chickens! I train, rescue, rehabilitate, and rehome chickens. I've had two separate instances of seven roosters, housed together WITH hens ( the most chickens I had at one point was twenty-seven ), and no crowing, no fighting.

    Crowing is caused by one of two things: Dominance or feeling unsafe. If YOU are dominant, your roosters won't have a reason to crow for that, and otherwise they'll crow if they feel unsafe or insecure in their environment, which you can also remedy by spending enough time with them to ensure your position of dominance means that they are well taken care of, they have plenty of food and water at all times, and there's nothing to worry about.

    For further information you can visit my blog , and for specific inquiries, you can feel free to Email me. :3
     
  5. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    Forks, WA
    Quote:You don't need to "train" chickens to allow roosters to live together without fighting. . . .




    Also, having just one rooster, sorry, but chances are he will crow, no matter what "training" goes on. Multiple roosters, sure, most won't crow, but otherwise. . . . There are indeed quieter breeds, and I always recommend breeds with a lower pitched crow.
     
  6. FarmGirl01

    FarmGirl01 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 5, 2008
    AR
    I like to compare bantams and standards like this... Bantams are like the yippie little dogs and standards are like the big wuff, wuff dogs. My neighbors standard roo is close to us, but he is hard to hear. I think my bantams are louder. Everyone has their on experiences. This one is mine. Not right or wrong.[​IMG] Good luck!
     
  7. gryeyes

    gryeyes Covered in Pet Hair & Feathers

    I have two Silver Sebright roosters which can out-crow my full-sized roosters, easily. Their voices are shrill, and they throw their whole upper bodies into the effort.

    I have at least eleven mature roosters right now. One bantam Cochin - yah, I know! - had to be culled because he was mean and he managed to kill some young pullets in vociferous mounting. Snapped their necks. Plus, he chased down larger roosters of low status and beat the snot out of them. I had to pull him off those terrified, meek, "Uncle!"- bawking roosters he'd cornered and was tearing into.

    But that is it. There are mock-fights, and cockerel displays of challenges, but no other mayhem.
     
  8. OlyChickenGuy

    OlyChickenGuy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Now, I never said you had to train them, I simply said that I DO train chickens. I've spent the past three years doing naught but studying chicken psychology and social behaviour. I currently only have two roosters, and no matter the number, I have NEVER had issues with crowing because the downright facts of crowing is that they crow out of dominance or fear. Neither of which are healthy states of mind to be in for domesticated animals.

    I find your need to place the word "train" in quotation marks offensive, as it seems like you are attempting to belittle my work. I do not know what I have done or said that makes you feel the need to do this. I apologise if I have come off as ignorant or pontificating, but I assure you that I have done my homework, I have worked with many chickens of all sorts of different breeds and sex, and my field studies have shown that training is psychologically healthy and that having multiple roosters together enhances crowing behaviour.

    While it's true that a lone rooster may crow out of boredom, or to try and "find" flock mates or other roosters since it's only natural for there to be multiple roosters together, but that crowing is a conversation, and thus reciprocated in a group setting, therefore leading to more crowing of flocks where their humans aren't as present as dominant figures, or in environments where they feel more insecure.
     
  9. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    Nope, not belittling with quotation marks. After all, you quoted your word "finding" how is it different? [​IMG] I'm just saying that, as you find yourself, training isn't required. I mainly talk about that word because you seem to bring it up a lot.

    But as someone who's worked with the behavior for 3 years, wouldn't you say though that training them to crow isn't exactly a solution for a new owner of a rooster? Personally I think pointing them to the fact that roosters generally crow, but some are quieter, is a simpler solution.

    Just my opinion. [​IMG]
     
  10. OlyChickenGuy

    OlyChickenGuy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ohh, no, no, I didn't mean to train them TO crow - just the opposite. I suppose there's not much training when working with natural psychology, though... but there's some psychological benefit to training an animal to do something you don't want it to, mainly in the area of it then having a clearer understanding of what is and is not appropriate for said behaviour. I wouldn't recommend that to people new to training, though.

    I throw out the training and psychology options simply because I know people will bring up the others, and I've rehomed several roosters to newbie chicken owners who have had wonderful experiences, and even now get back to me to tell me how happy they are. Finding good and loving homes for roosters is pretty hard, so when I find someone that's willing to take on the responsibility, I like to give them all the tools they might want or need, and a vastly different perspective from most of the advice they'll get.

    I have not had much conclusive experience with specific breeds and crowing styles. My Chabo had the most adorable voice in the world, and my Dutch Bantam mutt sounds like he's being strangled, I swear, whereas my Rhodies have all had pretty "normal" voices. The Campines I had for a short while also sounded kind of strangled, but they were adopted before they settled their voices, and the woman who adopted them said their voices cleared up quite a bit. However, even from that, those are only a handful of experiences and almost no breed comparison could be done, so it wouldn't be very helpful for me to make suggestions based on that.

    What is your experience with different breeds and their voices? :3
     

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