Are these chicks old enough to go outside?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by FowlWitch, Jul 3, 2019.

  1. FowlWitch

    FowlWitch Songster

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    They'll be in a sheltered coop with some older chicks. Day time temps range between mid 70s to low 80s, night time temps from mid 40s to low 60s. No rain projected for the upcoming weeks.

    They hatched different days ranging from June 23rd to June 27th.

    IMG_20190703_151113738.jpg
     
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  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Crossing the Road

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    I'd wait at least another couple weeks. Hopefully your night temperatures will be warmer by then.
     
  3. FowlWitch

    FowlWitch Songster

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    Night time temps don't look like they'll be up for a good while. Would it work out better if I put a heat lamp on a timer in the coop?
     
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  4. tayjamieson

    tayjamieson Chirping

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    I would keep them indoors until they are about the size of a kick ball (I know that's random but I can't remember what exact week I put mine outside and they did amazing). I'm sure someone else will comment and let you know a for sure age range in weeks.

    When they are that little they truly need those consistent high temperatures in order to survive and develop into healthy happy chickens. Also for their safety it's good to keep chicks together away from any threats such as other animals, predators, etc. I included a chart that displays temperature needs based on age in weeks. May I ask what the reason is behind you wanting to move them outdoors quickly?

    I don't know if you have older chickens out in your coop, but it's worth mentioning if you do that they will more than likely peck/bully the new chicks (pecking order establishment) and when the chicks are that young and still developing it can cause injuries, brain damage, or even death. They are super fragile when they are small so if you can hang in there until they have the required survival capabilities and skills that would be in the best interest of your sweet babies. Poultry-Chicks-Brooding-Temperature-Chart.png
     
  5. Texas Kiki

    Texas Kiki Egg Pusher

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    I'd put them out.
    :oops:
     
  6. RoosterML

    RoosterML Songster

    Heat lamp for nighttime outside would be fine. If it’s sunny they should warm up via sunshine. If no sunshine leave lamp on.
     
  7. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    How much older?
    How will you keep them separate?
    How big is your coop?
     
  8. FowlWitch

    FowlWitch Songster

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    I set up a sub-brooder in the coop to keep them separate from the older chicks. The older chicks are skittish but curious. I'm monitoring to make sure they aren't bullying the younger ones, but I think the new brooder is tall enough to keep them away from the younger ones. I also gave them their own food and water to reduce competition.
     
  9. FowlWitch

    FowlWitch Songster

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    Older chicks are about 2.5 weeks older, and the coop is 4 feet by 4 feet. I want to move them because I think they're stressing some weaker chicks that aren't growing as well as these 7. I just took a dead chick for a necropsy to figure out the issue, but the runts need to be kept away from the more robust chicks so I can monitor their health better. I'd keep the second brooder indoors if I had the space.
     
  10. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    4x4 is tight space to split for two groups.
    Who died , where and from what?
     

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