Are these eggs dangerous??

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by homesteadinmama, Jun 11, 2011.

  1. homesteadinmama

    homesteadinmama Chillin' With My Peeps

    199
    0
    99
    Mar 30, 2011
    Merrimack
    Okay so I am very new to chickens, but I have 12 pullets for egg laying. I had planned on giving away the eggs to friends and neighbors. However recently people that were interested in getting eggs are now "afraid" that they have salmonela on them and think the store bought ones don't because they are "factory washed". So I have a couple questions:
    1. Do all eggs have salmonela on the outside?
    2. Should I wash the eggs?


    I'd love to have some good responses. Thanks.
     
  2. mom'sfolly

    mom'sfolly Overrun With Chickens

    5,024
    66
    308
    Feb 15, 2007
    Austin area, Texas
    I don't know the actual statistics, but I believe that backyard flocks are less likely to be infected with salmonella. Salmonella actually infects the chicken, so the inside of the egg is infected. The shell may have bacteria on the outside, but it is a systemic infection that causes the problem with eggs. Large operations are more likely to spread the disease throughout a flock. Refrigerating your eggs immediately after gathering reduces the risks. I generally leave my eggs at room temp in the winter, and refrigerate immediately in the summer.
     
  3. Gallusfarm

    Gallusfarm Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,023
    19
    163
    Jul 14, 2009
    I've been eating and giving away our eggs for years. Keep the nest boxs clean, don't wash them until use (I even store ours on the counter for up to two weeks - yes it is OK). Never had a problem. It just kills me that folks would prefer a store egg to farm fresh!
     
  4. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

    28,907
    119
    408
    Nov 9, 2007
    SW Arkansas
    mom'sfolly :

    I don't know the actual statistics, but I believe that backyard flocks are less likely to be infected with salmonella. Salmonella actually infects the chicken, so the inside of the egg is infected. The shell may have bacteria on the outside, but it is a systemic infection that causes the problem with eggs. Large operations are more likely to spread the disease throughout a flock. Refrigerating your eggs immediately after gathering reduces the risks. I generally leave my eggs at room temp in the winter, and refrigerate immediately in the summer.

    Agreed. Factory farm eggs are more dangerous:

    http://www.motherearthnews.com/happy-homesteader/salmonella-outbreak-zb0z10zrog.aspx

    Print this one out for your paranoid family and friends:

    http://www.motherearthnews.com/natu...gg-recall-know-where-your-eggs-come-from.aspx
     
  5. mamawolf544

    mamawolf544 Unbreakable Heart

    2,433
    20
    203
    Apr 29, 2009
    alvarado, Tx
    Quote:Same here, I never wash or put an egg in the incubator.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by