Are they ok to eat?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Nett575, Jul 11, 2019 at 6:02 PM.

  1. Nett575

    Nett575 In the Brooder

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    20190711_154341.jpg I found these 2 eggs today. I am new to the whole fresh egg eating. Are they on to eat? What caused this? My 6 chicks are 16 weeks and we've have been getting about 2-4 eggs a day. Not sure which all are laying.
     
  2. FlyAnywayAJ

    FlyAnywayAJ Chirping

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    Not sure the cause, but our ladies lay eggs that look like those from time to time and we eat them with no issues. Hopefully others on the forum have more insight to cause, but I always figure nature doesn't have things cosmetically perfect every time. Like apples there's grade A that you find in grocery stores, but if you go to the farmer you can get grades B or C for cheaper because they aren't cosmetically perfect.
     
  3. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    They should be fine to eat, hopefully just a start up glitch.
    It can take up to a month or so for thing to smooth out.

    When in doubt....
    Open eggs one at a time in a separate dish before adding to pan or recipe,
    use your eyes, nose, and common sense to decide if egg is OK to eat.
     
  4. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Free Ranging

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    That kind of stuff is pretty normal, especially when they are first starting to lay. This link talks about various things that can happen but don't let it worry you. That happened because she is just learning to lay, the internal egg making factory is fairly complex, and sometimes it takes them a while to work out the kinks. Just be patient.

    https://thepoultrysite.com/publications/egg-quality-handbook

    Those look like they could even have been laid by the same pullet. That yellowish ring looks like two eggs may have been in the shell gland at the same time. One egg may have been delayed in being laid but usually that means the pullet mistakenly released two different yolks the same day. Both went through that internal egg-making factory and made an egg. When that happens one often has a pretty thin shell.

    Sometimes you get an egg that just has a membrane, no hard shell at all. I don't feel right eating those though they are probably safe. If it has a hard shell around it, even a very thin one, I eat them.
     
    aart likes this.

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