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Arsenic in water!!

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by irf1983, Nov 4, 2009.

  1. irf1983

    irf1983 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 7, 2009
    Brooksville, FL
    We recently found out that we have a high concentration of arsenic in our water, is this ok to give to the chickens?
     
  2. Princess Amri

    Princess Amri Is Mostly Harmless

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    How do I put this? No. I believe arsenic is that highly toxic poison, right? So no, you should NOT offer that water! Okay?
     
  3. irf1983

    irf1983 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Brooksville, FL
    Quote:Thank you, I especially appreciate the lack of condescension you showed in answering a legitimate question. Our high concentration of arsenic is just under 30 parts arsenic for every 1,000,000,000 parts water. So being that the ratio of arsenic is just the slightest sliver of a fraction of our water supply, and that many natural wells in rural areas contain higher levels of arsenic, I apparently stupidly assumed that other people may have experience with this situation. Kudos to you though for patronizing a stranger, it's people like you that make this site so valuable. If anyone has something productive to add I would appreciate some input. We live in a relatively large poultry farming area, I can't imagine all of their chickens are getting Zephyrhills.
     
  4. LynneP

    LynneP Chillin' With My Peeps

    The good news is that water purification systems are available. I'm more concerned about you, really. We had a huge scare here years ago in the community of Waverley, and the village eventually got a water supply plumbed in. But a few homes were unable to benefit because of location and were the test sites for a purification unit on the premises. Now, the system is in widespread use and your local well purification people should be able to guide you regarding this process. I believe the most common method uses manganese dioxide.
     
  5. danielle82

    danielle82 A Good Egg

    Apr 27, 2009
    Tonasket Wa
    when they tested our water (city water) they said there was low levels of arsenic (I can't remember the amount) We've always used a brita (even before they tested) for in the house, but Ive always just used te hose for the animals. I think with the cumulative is why its bad. Humans have very long life expectancies so after 80 years that would be bad. Animals have much shorter life expectancies, thus the cumulation isn't as high.
     
  6. irf1983

    irf1983 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you, luckily, my wife and I have always used bottled water to drink, and we will start using it to cook as well. We are also getting a filtered tap installed. We're looking into whole house filters, I'll look into the manganese dioxide. Thank you all for your help!
     
  7. 3goodeggs

    3goodeggs pays attention sporadically

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    Does arsnic build up in the body like mercury? Would eating the eggs or meat of your chickens just add more arsenic to your bodies?
    Does it bind up in fat? or in calcium? Off to google! Inquiring mind needs to know!
     
  8. 3goodeggs

    3goodeggs pays attention sporadically

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    I found this: http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/food/food-safety/animal-feed-and-food/animal-feed-and-the-food-supply-105/chicken-arsenic-and-antibiotics/index.htm

    I
    don't know if that will work when all is said and done. Compters are new to me.


    The EPA has a great site on what to do about your water. Google 'arsenic in drinking water.' It is the first one I think. levels are okay to .010ppm. you are like .000,000,03ppm, right? Is the person doing the test selling water purification systems?
    Sorry that this happened. We had a water test decades ago and the lead level was through the roof. We had it re-done and everything was normal. Errors happen. Might be cheaper to have it taken again.

    If you do get a system, just have all of the well water go through it, so that every tap has filtered water. You know, just in case you need to drink out of the hose for some reason. And when you wash your car it won't have hard water marks either.
    May as well get those old lead water pipes replace while you are at it. $cha-ching!$
     
  9. irf1983

    irf1983 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Thank you very much, I appreciate the help. I was considering having it done again, because our neighbors have all tested low. We are at the base of a spring, which may be why ours tested higher, but it may just be an error. Arsenic is not cumulative, but I know certain veggies will absorb and retain high levels, I do not know about eggs, that is ono of my concerns. Hopefully somebody else will have some ideas. Thanks again!
     
  10. wombat

    wombat Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 23, 2009
    If I'm reading your post correctly, you have a concentration of .03 parts per million (30 per 1,000,000,000 in your post). Is that correct?

    The EPA standard used to be .05 ppm, but it was lowered to .01 ppm in 2006. You would have been within the EPA guidelines for human drinking water consumption up until the 2006 rules went into effect.

    See this:
    http://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/pubs/PDF/B1301.pdf

    Looks like 1.0 ppm is a rule of thumb for poultry.

    I'm guessing your birds would not live long enough to consume enough arsenic from your drinking water for it to be a health risk to them. As far as consuming your birds being a health risk to you, your birds may be getting less arsenic from your water than commercial birds get from their feed and litter. I have seen studies indicating impact to laying and reproductive levels, but it was at higher concentrations of arsenic, near the top end of the limit in the UGA link above. You're well under that.

    Disclaimer: I'm not an environmental engineer!

    To answer 3Good:
    Arsenic can kill quickly, or over time, depending on the concentration and frequency of exposure. In high concentrations, it is immediately toxic. In moderate concentrations, it kills, and was used as a poison in the ol' days Europe because the poisoning symptoms looked similar to cholera. It was referred to as "inheritance powder" in its heyday as a murder weapon. In smaller doses over time, it leads to arsenicosis, and to increased risk of cancer and organ damage. Yes, accumlated exposure to dietary sources over time is a concern. Poultry consumption is of particular concern because of high levels of arsenic in some commercial poultry feeds and litter.
     

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