Arthritis in the foot?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Thread-wing, Apr 21, 2012.

  1. Thread-wing

    Thread-wing New Egg

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    Apr 21, 2012
    I have had my Rhode Island Red, Tiny, for at least 5 years. I know she's nearing the end of her life because she's outlived all her sisters by at least a year, and I want to know if there is anything I can do to soothe her arthritic feet. She's cage free, sharing about half an acre of yards space with four young, energetic hens (each less than a year old)
    Any suggestions?

    Also, she's very comfortable being picked up and handled and has even fallen asleep in my lap
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2012
  2. klmclain1

    klmclain1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 14, 2011
    Keeping in mind I know little to nothing about arthritis in chickens... I know you can dissolve an aspirin in the drinking water. Aspirin is an anti-inflamatory (NSAID) and will relieve arthritis pain. However, long-term may have some adverse effects.
     
  3. Thread-wing

    Thread-wing New Egg

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    Apr 21, 2012
    Thanks for the tip, I wasn't aware you could actually give a chicken aspirin. I've been giving her warm baths in olive oil and feeding her carrots, which I read somewhere was supposed to be helpful
     
  4. klmclain1

    klmclain1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 14, 2011
    I've also heard that blueberries have a natural pain killer in them as well.
     
  5. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    I had one BR hen with very arthritic feet, poor old girl. All we did was make sure that in cold weather, she had a heat spot on the roost she could go to--she was over 5 years old. I currently have one with obvious arthritis in one foot, another BR. You can give baby aspirin on occasion, but you really shouldn't give it as a matter of course. Best if she doesn't go out in wet, cold weather is all I can offer. Lexie was always picking her feet up high and flexing them, or holding them up. They were knotty/gnarly and obviously painful, but we just made sure she had a place that was warmer for her in winter, though we never heat our coops. Didn't want to make her suffer for a principle (not heating the coop), you know.
     

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