Aspiration Signs and Symptoms?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Gemsbok, Oct 13, 2016.

  1. Gemsbok

    Gemsbok Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 6, 2015
    So after a trip to the vet, my 12 week old pullet is on two different liquid medicines, which I have to administer a total of four times per day (.04-1ml per dose, depending on the medicine). Despite looking at diagrams and being taught how by the vet, horror stories of syringe medication drowning birds have got me extremely paranoid. I've even taken to putting my ear right on her back to try and listen for something out of the ordinary after I give her the meds. Are there any signs of liquid aspiration to look out for? Would it be possible to accidentally get the liquid in her trachea and she just would not react to it at all? Any sounds to be aware of in her breathing? Or is it just immediate death or eventual pneumonia, without warning?
     
  2. minihorse927

    minihorse927 Whipper snapper Premium Member

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    While I can understand the worry, as long as you take it slow giving the medications you most likely will not have an issue. when a chicken aspirates water or medication it is generally pretty obvious as they will cough and sneeze and gurgle. If you put your head against the chest you will most likely be able to hear rattling in the case of aspiration. How much is aspirated depends on whether it ends in pneumonia or almost immediate death.

    Best advice is to take it slow. A drop at a time and don't rush the bird. I've never had a problem unless I try to rush
     
  3. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    @Gemsbok , if she aspirates any you will know right away and she will start open mouth breathing and you might hear rales. What medications are you giving?

    How to give Oral Medications

    Oral Dosing by @new 2 pfowl

    • How do I know if I should be administering medication orally?

    This depends upon various factors, such as what the medication is and how ill your bird is. In general, keep in mind that oral dosing is often the best way to control dosage and to ensure that your bird actually receives this dosage.

    • What tools do I need to dose orally? Where do I get them?

    You will need a small oral medication (needleless) syringe, suggested size 1 ml/cc, depending upon the dose being administered. They can be easily obtained online (for example, search for “oral medication syringe” on Amazon).
    [​IMG]

    • How do I do it, anyways?

    You will need a helper to ensure the safety and proper medication of your bird.

    1. Have your medication measures and the syringe prepared before taking any action.
    2. Catch and restrain the bird.
    3. Have your helper gently pry the bird’s beak open.

    [​IMG]

    4. Be sure that you understand where the medication-filled syringe should be inserted.
    The opening in the center at the back of the tongue is the trachea – nothing should ever go in there!

    [​IMG]


    5. Gently insert the syringe alongside the tongue (bird's right side), and inject the medication slowly to ensure that it does not spill over into the trachea.

    [​IMG]

    Crop feeding videos

    These are using a crop needle, not a plastic tube.

    -Kathy
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2016
  4. Gemsbok

    Gemsbok Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 6, 2015
    Thank you for the responses and instructions! I'm giving her .4ml loxicom once daily for a swollen/injured hock, and a pill of clindamycin crushed with a small amount of water 3 times a day to keep infection at bay, since she scratched up her wing pretty bad with her nails. Im very happy to hear that it'd be obvious, that puts me a bit more at ease that I wont find her dead hours later because I had no idea she had inhaled water, and that I've been doing it correctly.
     
  5. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Even if she did aspirate a little of the medication I think she would be fine. :D Hope she gets better. :fl

    -Kathy
     

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