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  1. Poulets De Cajun

    Poulets De Cajun Overrun With Chickens

    I realize that aspiration has something to do with the birds airway being blocked by liquid or solid material. But does someone have a better explanation? Maybe a diagram of what happens?

    And, in the event of aspiration, is there anything that can be done at the time to save the bird? Is there a chicken heimlich maneuver?

    I know what aspiration is generally, but dont know specifics as I have been lucky enough to not have to deal with this much. But I was thinking about it because I am bathing birds regularly now, and I want to be prepared unless one inadvertently aspirates water while I'm bathing them.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 27, 2008
  2. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    http://ohioline.osu.edu/vme-fact/0020.html
    Performing
    a Physical Exam on a Chicken
    "...Restraining the bird is important when performing a physical exam. It is important to keep the bird calm so that it does not hurt itself or the handler. If the bird appears stressed, place light linen over the head until the bird calms. To hold the bird for examination, reach over the back and hold the wings down to restrain it. Then, pick the bird up and insert your fingers between the legs. Restraining the bird up-side-down is not ideal as it may increase the stress level of the bird and also cause regurgitation and possibly subsequent aspiration pneumonia. After the bird is restrained, the exam can begin. If the physical exam is performed in the field, it is best to do it in the early morning (especially in the summertime) to reduce the stress on the bird......"

    http://www.vin.com/VINDBPub/SearchPB/Proceedings/PR05000/PR00345.htm
    Major Anatomical and Physiological Differences between Birds and Mammals

    Teresa L. Lightfoot D.V.M., Diplomate ABVP - Avian
    "....20) No epiglottis (nothing to cover and protect the tracheal opening). This makes aspiration of food more likely and produces the great expulsion of air that accompanies a bird scream....
    .Respiration
    In additional to the increased oxygen requirements of birds mentioned previously, several other factors of avian respiration are important in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease in birds. Since there is no separation between the chest and abdomen, masses, fluid or other abdominal disease in birds can make respiration more difficult. Birds will often appear to have respiratory problems, exhibited by tail bobbing, open- mouth breathing and increased respiratory rates, when in actuality there is an infection or a mass in the abdomen that is causing this increased respiratory effort. Also, the communication of air into the bones of birds makes it possible for a fractured bone to be the cause of respiratory distress or infection. A physical examination will determine if there is increased space between the end of the keel bone and the pubis (generally indicating an abdominal mass). Blood work and radiographs are useful in determining if abdominal organ enlargement exists that is causing the respiratory problem..."
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. Poulets De Cajun

    Poulets De Cajun Overrun With Chickens

    OK. The first link tells me how to do an examination, and the second tells me that chickens do not have the covering over their trachea like humans do. Therefore its easier for food and water to "go down the wrong pipe" as we are all taught as children..... Am I correct?

    Now, in the event that a bird DOES aspirate water or food, what can I do to help remove the blockage? Since birds breathe with their abdomen, and little to no internal lung movement, would compressing and releasing of the abdomen help move air into and out of the lung to clear the blockage?
     
  4. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    unfortunately in this case there is absolutely nothing you can do....it is why I am so vehemently opposed to turning a chicken upside down > not worth the risk.
     
  5. Poulets De Cajun

    Poulets De Cajun Overrun With Chickens

    So if a chicken aspirates anything, even if they dont die immedately, they are pretty much done and over with eventually?

    And what would someone turn a chicken upside down for anyway?
     
  6. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    As I understand it, if you even suspect this has happened then the articles I have read (vet) always treat (AB)

    I often see people advised to turn the bird upside down:
    ...to "train" the roosters not to be agressive (even if no aspiration occurs this puts incredible strains on the birds ability to breathe!)

    ... to empty crop contents in cases of sour crop/imacted crop [​IMG]
     
  7. chickenzoo

    chickenzoo Emu Hugger

    I didn't know that chickens have 3 holes in their mouth. One on the top that goes to the sinuses and such, one behind the tong,SP, that goes to the respiratory system and the other further back to the crop and stomach. I found out about it doing research on tube feeding.
    I wonder if you could some how suction it out?
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2008
  8. helenoftroy

    helenoftroy New Egg

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    Will it kill her? I'm pretty sure I got a bit of oil in the wrong spot while administering some to help out with an impacted crop. She is panting a bit, but seems to be getting better with the passing moments.
     
  9. casportpony

    casportpony Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Someone posted once that their rooster died from them carrying him upside down. Apparently his crop was full of water.

    I also cringe when I read about people vomiting their birds..

    -Kathy
     
  10. casportpony

    casportpony Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    I've had a few aspirate a little liquid and they've been fine. When properly held, bathed, examined, etc., this should never be a problem. Just don't mess with them when they have a crop full of liquid. [​IMG] Check crop before doing anything, if crop if full of fluids, put down and let crop clear before bathing it.

    -Kathy
     

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