asymptomatic carriers?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Hennyhandler, Dec 6, 2012.

  1. Hennyhandler

    Hennyhandler SilkieJax

    Jun 10, 2009
    Cullman
    There are plenty of people on here that have mentioned that a bird of theirs has shown signs of a respiratory disease and whether they treat or cull going by what I have researched the other birds around the sick one could be asymptomatic carriers. Supposedly this means that you should have a closed flock and not sell any birds or eggs. Now, here is my question. Does this mean that everyone on here that has had respiratory issues should not be selling their birds. Is there people out there who have NEVER had one of their birds come up sick? I mean there are many that have had a bird come up sick and not know one hundred percent what the problem is and they either somehow fix it or they have to cull but that doesn't mean their birds haven't been exposed. What are ya'lls opinion on this and how do you see it?
     
  2. karma

    karma Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 10, 2010
    Its a risk buying birds from others. I have done it many times, thinking people sometimes need to get rid of their birds because of moving, complaining neighbors, etc. Now I must have a closed flock and no breeding because the last group of birds i bought although looked healthy and beautiful, brought in a disease and now they are all carriers. I just couldnt cull the whole flock.
    You could quarantine, but I don't have a separate coop and you should really not even wear the same clothes, shoes from coop to coop.
     
  3. Hennyhandler

    Hennyhandler SilkieJax

    Jun 10, 2009
    Cullman
    Oh, I don't have the problem. I was just thinking about it. I guess what I am wondering is, like with you, you buy these birds and they are sick but how do you know that what they have is contagious or that is is something that they will always carry if you don't know one hundred percent what the disease or sickness they have is.
    Also, let's say that you haven't brought in any birds but one of yours gets sick. Well, it couldn't have caught anything unless you bring it on you or on something else but not from another bird. SO you treat this bird and then it gets better. How do you know that this bird is a carrier? Especially if no one else gets sick with the same symptoms. Can you chalk it up to something just happened with the bird only?
    How can you ensure that your flock has no problems or diseases at all besides never letting anything on your property? I am sure in this case you cannot but if you still decide to bring birds in how can you be comfortable?

    I know this is a lot of questions and I am sorry if this comes off confusing. I was just wondering how others handle this.
     
  4. karma

    karma Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 10, 2010
    I ended up bringing my birds to the vet to get a definitive answer on what they had because I wanted to know what I was dealing with. There are many diseases with puffy eye & respiratory symptoms which is what i had. The new birds started sneezing & in 2 weeks the original birds got it. But the vet bill was over $500.00 and I know many people will/ or can not pay that. Even if you never bring new birds in, wild birds can bring in disease also. Thats why alot of people say "all in, all out". No adding to your flock along the way, unless ur adding by breeding your own.
     
  5. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Nov 27, 2008
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Here's a link to respiratory diseases in poultry. Most, if not all diseases shown in the link are contageous to other birds in some manner. Birds that survive are carriers, forever. Bloodwork or necropsy by a vet, state, or college lab can determine what type of disease(s) a person could be dealing with in their flock....it's the only sure way to tell. Symptoms of diseases can be treated, but never cured. Karma is correct, wild birds are always a factor introducing diseases and parasites.
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2012

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