At a loss.

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by rlmullins, Feb 19, 2016.

  1. rlmullins

    rlmullins Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 19, 2016
    Hi everyone I am new to this sight. I am working on my first incubation set up, and I need lots of help. I made my own incubator out of a styrofoam cooler, it is still air, my humidity was around 55% and temp was around 99 to 102 through the first part, then I got humidity up to 65% to 70% when I put them on lock down, hatch day was yesterday, put nothing happened, so I did a float test just to see if they were alive and all but three were, now I have one that is alive but not sure it will make it, they never piped, and when I opened the one that were dead the yolk sack was still in the shell and was not absorbed, can some one please lead me in the right direction on what I am doing wrong, I have a second incubator set up with more eggs, I don't want to loose them all, they are my own eggs. Oh and I have candled most of the new ones and they are looking good so far.
     
  2. feedman77

    feedman77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sounds like humidity may have been a little high during incubation.

    I dry incubate myself. I try to keep it humidity at 25 ti 35 percent. Then raise to about 70 for lockdown.

    But that's what seems to have worked for me.
     
  3. feedman77

    feedman77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    :welcome
     
  4. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

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    xs 2

    [​IMG]

    I agree. I also use a low incubation method and check my air cells for proper growth to guide me how to adjust if needed. Styros especially seem to do better with a low incubation metod- wit the exception of high altitude hatches. I run at 30% for the first 17 days and 5% at hatch

    One of the most important things is haveing accurate-checked thermometers. Even brand new ones can be way off.

    With still air, you really want to get the temps as steady as you can in the 101-102F area (taken near the top of the eggs.

    I'll give you a link for a humidity piece. This is the method I use and it has a good air cell graph too.
    http://letsraisechickens.weebly.com...anuals-understanding-and-controlling-humidity
     
  5. rlmullins

    rlmullins Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 19, 2016
    Thanks everyone, I have redone my two incubators and I have 40% humidity that is as low as I can get them to go for some reason, my temps are at 100 and steady, I am hoping I can get this right, I have 5 that go on lock down in 5 days, I hope I have not messed them up, I have a few more to that on lock down a day after for the next few weeks, I had eggs I add as the where laid, but I have a hatch incubator set up, and the one I have in waiting are in my brooder under a heat lamp, I am looking for any advice that might help me, and thanks again.[​IMG]
     
  6. feedman77

    feedman77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If your hydrometer is right you can use rice in a bowl will help pull humidity out of air and lower humidity some more.
     
  7. rlmullins

    rlmullins Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 19, 2016
    I am using a digital acurite thermometer, it gauges temp. and humidity, it seems to be right on.
     
  8. rlmullins

    rlmullins Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 19, 2016
    What humidity do I need to be on till lock down, and is 100 temp good for still air.
     
  9. feedman77

    feedman77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would say your fine til lockdown at 40.

    Then raise to about 70 til hatch.

    I use forced air. But I think in still air is 101 at top of eggs
     
  10. red horse ranch

    red horse ranch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    One thing that hasn't been mentioned is the need for oxygen. If your incubator is sealed too well then the chicks may suffocate before hatching. It's a fine line between getting enough ventilation and having so much air flow that you lose your humidity. A styrofoam incubator is easy to add ventilation too. Just take a small finishing nail and carefully push it thru. One or two holes near the bottom on each side of the incubator.

    I think you will be okay at 100 degrees for the lockdown. When the humidity in increased for hatching it can make it more difficult for the chicks to get the oxygen they need. So the lower temp should help. I always lockdown at between 55 to 65% humidity. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2016

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