At what temp. should you use heat lamp in coop for adult hens?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by dinologano, Oct 18, 2009.

  1. dinologano

    dinologano Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 13, 2009
    Salem, Oregon
    It's me again, another newbie to this fowl world.

    I turned on my red heat lamp when the temp at night(salem Oregon) got down in the mid to low 40's. The hens would usually roost on their nests at night (and of course poop in the nests which I cleaned out every morning), but noticed when the heat lamps were on they apparently were not roosting there as usual, very little poop. So that's why I'm wondering at what temp I should use the lamp. It will be getting in late Nov. in the low 30's and sometimes in the high 20's.

    thanks Deane
    [email protected]
     
  2. TexasVet

    TexasVet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 12, 2008
    Willis TX
    I don't use heat lamps for full-grown hens unless it drops to near or below 20 degrees. Anything above that they seem to take in stride, as long as they're dry and out of the wind.

    Kathy, Bellville TX
    www.ChickenTrackin.com
     
  3. key west chick

    key west chick Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 31, 2008
    Gainesville, GA
    I live in north Ga and while we dont get really cold here, I rarely supply heat to my adult birds. If the night time temps drop below about 25, I sometimes use a propane heater, but i think its more for me than for them!
     
  4. dinologano

    dinologano Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 13, 2009
    Salem, Oregon
    My chicken coop is not insulated and I have blocked off the vent that prevents the prevailing wind from entering, but other vent is open which means that the inside temp will approximate the outside temp. So just to make sure I understand these chickens can withstand temperatures down to 25 degrees F. I don't want any frozen chickens here.
    Thanks.

    Deane
     
  5. wombat

    wombat Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 23, 2009
    Quote:Down to 25f should be fine.

    You want ventilation up above them, but no drafts where they roost. You do want to keep moisture from accumulating in the coop. cold+damp=frostbite.

    You can put a "huddle box" with straw or shavings on the floor for them to crowd into for warmth if it is really cold. Just turn a wooden crate or cardboard box on its side.

    Straw bales can be stacked to block wind that's hitting the exposed side of the coop, too.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2009
  6. purpletree23

    purpletree23 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 15, 2009
    What kind of chickens do you have? Tiny bantams or larger breed birds like Rhode Island Reds?
     
  7. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    I've never given extra heat to my birds, bantie or standard. However, we usually only have winters in the 20's for a few weeks, and usually in the 30's at night.

    There are people in cold areas with -20 or more wind chills that do not heat, just provide a draft free place for their birds to sleep.
     
  8. Uppity Peon

    Uppity Peon Chillin' With My Peeps

    Just down the road here, my neighbor has been keeping chickens for years and not used any heat for his flock in winter. I don't plan on it either. My chickens are medium to large in size and the coop is small enough that I think their body heat will keep it a bit warmer than outside temps.
     
  9. dinologano

    dinologano Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 13, 2009
    Salem, Oregon
    I now have 14 chickens in two separate coops that I butted together. 1 Bovan, 2 laced Wyndottes, Blue Andalusian, 2 Aracunas, Leghorn, Maran, Bardrock, Silkie and 2 bantam Sebrights, Buff Brahm and Salmon Favorelle. Excuse the spelling.
    Deane
     
  10. key west chick

    key west chick Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 31, 2008
    Gainesville, GA
    My chickens are just in those large dog kennels, no enclosed coop at all. I just block off 3 sides with tarps to keep the wind off them and they are fine. Even my seramas.
     

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