Atomic Turkeys

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by ivan3, Apr 1, 2009.

  1. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    While hunting down info. on Ocellated turks, this unusual tome appeared:

    [​IMG]

    I was able to secure a hard copy from Lee Kirk at: http://www.printsandthepaper.com/about.asp? ,whose daughter (before her untimely death) was a member of an earlier iteration of BYC (small world).

    According to the introduction, the initial dissections (BBB's and White Hollands) took place out at UC Davis in 1943. The AEC's Division of Medicine published it in 1969. It is more than thorough (259 pg./beautiful line drawings).

    If anyone else is interested, you can `adopt' (sponsor) the book and the Dept. of Commerce's digitizing bureau will, for ~$60.00, scan it as an Adobe Acrobat image file and place it on their site for download.

    http://www.osti.gov/energycitations/product.biblio.jsp?osti_id=4811958


    I'm just scanning everything in multiple formats at present.

    Now, as to why the AEC (now DOE) took this interest in galliformes is anyone's guess. I can find nothing in the above ground test (s) info about turkeys being used as either sentinels or as some other bioassay (plenty of beagles and sheep, but no turks).
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2009
  2. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    I'm bumping this old thread as I went ahead and sponsored this book (link provided below).

    The PDF is 8megs. It is a very good reference on turkeys (gallinaceous birds in general - including chickens, of course).

    http://www.osti.gov/energycitations/purl.cover.jsp?purl=/4811958-FJViLM/

    BackyardChickens has made its way into the U.S. Department of Energy's Citation database (stealth advertising).
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    Last edited: Jun 4, 2009
  3. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    ...Now, as to why the AEC (now DOE) took this interest in galliformes is anyone's guess. ...

    I think I might be able to (perhaps) shed some light on that...
    I recall a posting on the original board (hmm maybe I posted it? LOL can't remember) whereby the government did some testing throwing frozen chickens out of a plane (forget now the purpose of it was) > perhaps turkeys were used also?
    Oh my I shall try and see if i can recall enough to find the link.​
     
  4. chickenannie

    chickenannie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I thought I was smart, but y'all lost me with all the big words and the throwing chickens out of the plane stuff. [​IMG]
     
  5. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    dlhunicorn wrote: recall a posting on the original board (hmm maybe I posted it? LOL can't remember) whereby the government did some testing throwing frozen chickens out of a plane (forget now the purpose of it was) > perhaps turkeys were used also?

    Ah, yes. The turbine blade tests (anyone who's interested can probably hunt down the video of the high speed/slow motion vids of those tests on the web). I know they used chickens, but that was the FAA.

    I was thinking that this might have been put together in order to be very precise in describing the traumatic injuries/burns suffered from `weapons effects' by staking out caged turks at various distances from the above ground nuclear tests.

    Another hypothesis is that Prof. Kaiser of GWU in DC (one of the authors) was a relative of the ship building/steel/insurance magnate Henry J. Kaiser (had his sticky beak in the heart of the military industrial complex), might have been doing a favor. Have yet to find complete geneaology of either.

    chickenannie wrote: I thought I was smart, but y'all lost me with all the big words and the throwing chickens out of the plane stuff.

    The turbine tests were meant to determine how much `bird' could be `eaten' by a jet engine without suffering catastrophic failure (the recent U.S.Air flight 1549 went belly into the Hudson after sucking in some geese). There is a possibility this book might have been used as a reference in ID'ing/describing the precise trauma suffered by the birds as part of the test protocols.

    The book is the best anatomy text on turks available without paying a fairly substantial sum. If one wants to know exactly what has been broken or gnawed (muscles and bones) this is an excellent reference. Turkey `sushi' chefs with exacting requirements might find it useful as well...​
     
  6. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    yes indeedy that was it! (thanks for refreshing my memory)
    Turkey `sushi' chefs with exacting requirements might find it useful as well...

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Gazinga

    Gazinga Chook Norris

    Anyone know of a link to book this indepth about chickens avaialble as a free download like this one?
     
  8. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    Gazinga wrote: Anyone know of a link to book this indepth about chickens avaialble as a free download like this one?

    Well, a quick run through the bibliography of the AEC reference above lists the following (available on google books - out of copyright) 6.5MB PDF. (Benjamin Franklyn Kaupp, 1918, 363pg.).

    http://books.google.com/books?q=anatomy+of+the+domestic+fowl+Benamin+Franklyn+Kaupp

    you won't be disappointed with the level of, how do the wise guys put it these days, granularity?​
     

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