attempting to breed araucanas -- emphasis on attempt --

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by amazondoc, Jan 7, 2009.

  1. amazondoc

    amazondoc Cracked Egghead

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    I am beginning to experience first hand the problems with producing araucanas.

    In my first batch of eggs -- which was really too old before I started incubation -- only 1 out of about 20 eggs developed. That 1 stopped about half way through development. I'm blaming the lethal tufted gene.

    In my second batch, I had 19 araucana eggs and 9 cochins. Again, only 1 araucana egg has developed. 6 cochin eggs are developing. These 7 eggs just went to the hatcher yesterday.

    With araucanas, of course, I'm battling at least a coupla known problems: the lethal tufted gene, and infertility due to the taillessness. In my specific case, I know that I am also suffering from a low roo/hen ratio -- I've got 11 bantam hens in the pen with only one roo.

    I can change the ratio when I get another pen finished. What else can I do? My conditions are: incubator humidity 45-50%, hatcher humidity 60-65%, temp in both 100 (both are forced air).

    Any input welcomed!
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2009
  2. needmorechickens!

    needmorechickens! Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 2, 2008
    West TN
    Well, you already know more about Araucanas than I do, but I wish you the best. When you get it figured out, you can school us on it! [​IMG]
    ~Rebecca
     
  3. geareduplyn

    geareduplyn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If you have the space break your hens into three groups. Move your Cock bird every 5 days. There are other methods for greater fertility. AI for one.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2009
  4. amazondoc

    amazondoc Cracked Egghead

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    Hey there --

    I've got the *space*, but I haven't got the *pens* -- yet. I've actually got three roos, but I'm trying to keep them separate so I know who my chicks came from. As soon as I finish more pens, I can split the hens between the roos. I'm sure that will help some, and perhaps the onset of spring will improve fertility as well. Also, I suspect that another part of the problem is that this roo seems to prefer breeding the tailed birds -- non-araucana bantams -- so if I moved those girls to another pen he'd probably work more on the araucanas. Which will also require another pen.

    It's always sumthin. Thanks for your input!
     
  5. KellyHM

    KellyHM Overrun With Chickens

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    I'm pretty sure (although not positive) that you shouldn't breed tufted to tufted...this will take care of the lethal factor. (Like frizzle x frizzle).
     
  6. amazondoc

    amazondoc Cracked Egghead

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    Tufted x tufted = 1/4 dead in shell, 1/2 tufted chicks, 1/4 clean faced chicks

    Tufted x clean = 1/2 tufted, 1/2 clean faced

    Most of my birds are tufted. Breeding tufted to tufted maximizes the ratio of tufted to clean chicks, although it does decrease your hatch numbers by 1/4.

    Thanks for your input!
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2009
  7. KellyHM

    KellyHM Overrun With Chickens

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    If you still get only 1/2 tufted chicks either way, wouldn't it be better to breed tufted x clean and have all live chicks, then sell the ones you don't want? Or use the clean faced ones for your breeding program? Just makes sense since you still get the same amount of tufteds either way. [​IMG]
     
  8. amazondoc

    amazondoc Cracked Egghead

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    Not really, because then I have to worry about what to do with the clean faced birds. It's sort of like having extra roosters. Wouldn't you rather have a way of cutting down on the extra roosters before they ever hatch? It's not like these guys are even big enough to be worth eating. [​IMG]
     
  9. sara

    sara Title Needed Here

    Even with the lethal gene you should have more than one egg developing. Check their rear ends and see if the vents are clear. You may have to trim or pluck them if feathers are blocking them. I've had one rooster to 8-10 hens with no fertility problems. [​IMG]
     
  10. amazondoc

    amazondoc Cracked Egghead

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    Quote:Yeah, I meant that I blamed the lethal gene for that one chick that started developing and quit -- not for all the clear ones.

    Check their rear ends and see if the vents are clear. You may have to trim or pluck them if feathers are blocking them. I've had one rooster to 8-10 hens with no fertility problems. [​IMG]

    Thanks for the idea!​
     

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