Aureomycin Crumbles va powdered tetracycline

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by kyleen, Sep 28, 2016.

  1. kyleen

    kyleen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Does anyone recommend Aureomycin crumbles versus the powder you put in water? My hands have a respiratory infection. I fed them antibiotics for a couple days in their water, then I switched to the crumbles. My older hens seem to be getting better. But my younger rooster and hens is still sneezing.
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Aureomycin is chlortetracycline, and is used for prevention of some intestinal and respiratory diseases in chickens. I'm not sure if it is as effective as the powder version added to water for 7-14 days for an acute infection. I think it may be for use more as a preventative, or used when a disease is already in the flock, and the chickens would basically be on it for some time.
    I would be good to know what disease you are treating, since only mycoplasma and bacterial diseases will be affected by antibiotics.Testing may be available by contacting your vet, state vet, or local extension agent. For instance, if they have infectious bronchitis (a virus) or something else, the disease won't be affected and will have to run it's course over several weeks. It may help to prevent secondary bacterial diseases, however.
    Here is some info on both types of aureomycin:
    https://www.zoetisus.com/products/poultry/aureomycin.aspx
    https://www.drugs.com/vet/aureomycin-soluble-powder-concentrate.html

    Here is a good link to read on the common respiratory diseases and symptoms, including MG, MS, IB, ILT, and aspergillosis:

    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2016
  3. carrieb62

    carrieb62 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I can't really make a recommendation as to which is better because it depends on the diagnosis and what is really wrong with them. What I can recommend is the products you mentioned will be leaving the store shelves January 2017 because of the FDA Veterinary Feed Directive and they will no longer be available OTC and you will have to seek veterinary assistance to obtain a prescription for the product, so with that said - stock up on both and look for a veterinarian practicing in avian health. And for the list of medications leaving OTC status you will find those here... http://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/ucm482106.htm
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Interesting to read that. The list includes pretty much all of the antibiotics backyard chicken keepers rely on to treat respiratory, intestinal, and wound infections. Then there is the problem that many local vets will not treat chickens, while there are no avian vets in many areas of the country or overseas.
     
  5. carrieb62

    carrieb62 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It's going to be a brutally scary time for the livestock market overall because of the FDA changes going into effect.
    I'm blessed to have an avian veterinarian locally where I live. The best recommendations that I can make for the changes
    coming -
    1). Learn how to use injectable antibiotics - those are not being removed from the shelves as of yet.
    2). Work to promote gut health in your chickens which includes proper de-worming. Internal parasite infestations can cause
    respiratory symptoms.
    3). Learn the herbs like oregano oil for example. I use the oregano oil from Dr. Peter Brown's First State Vet Supply and the
    stuff is FABULOUS!
    4). Use your preventatives like herbal formulas and stock up on whatever you can of the man made stuff so you'll have
    something on hand to treat with in the event of an crisis. Living in a FL environment I've learned crisis can happen a lot
    and that preventatives, while they don't 'cure" a problem, using them helps enhance the benefit of when you have to
    use the man made medicines because the bird is already that much stronger.
     

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