auto waterer with chicken nipples?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by KYChixMama, Apr 28, 2011.

  1. KYChixMama

    KYChixMama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm so excited! I bought PVC today to make an auto feeder and also an auto waterer for my Aquamiser chicken nipples. I think I have the feeder figured out, but has anyone here made an auto waterer? I was thinking of using a bucket (elevated) dropping down to a pvc bar with the nipples attached. If you've made one, would you post a pic and offer any advice you may have?

    Here's kind of what I'm thinking of ...
     
  2. Capvin

    Capvin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 13, 2011
    Lake Placid, FL
    No, I have not made one, but I really like the auto waterer idea and I plan on doing it. What is your plan for an auto feeder?
     
  3. ralleia

    ralleia Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Omaha, NE
    How many birds are you trying to keep watered?

    I'm heavily researching my own automatic chicken watering system and will be happy to share with you what I've dug out from reading the chicken pages. I'm trying to water about 40 chickens for 3 days at a time. I'm planning on acquiring a rectangular storage tank to feed the PVC.

    A good thread that I found on the subject is at https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=189137&p=10

    So
    far I've gleaned that the height of the nipples should be 14 to 18 inches.

    The PVC is most effectively supported by hanging it from the ceiling, supported at several locations along the length. This also allows for easily raising and lowering it until you have it correct.

    I'm planning on using the screw-in type rather than the push-ins; the latter are more prone to leaking.

    When using a storage tank, a BYC expert on the subject (Neil G.) states that the discharge tube from the tank should be no more than 6" above the height of the nipples (to avoid causing too much water pressure). He also suggests that 1/4 plastic tubing be used to connect from the tank to the the PVC.
    ----------------------------------------------------------

    That summarizes the most important stuff I've found so far. Less important details I'm working on are:

    1) having an additional short run of waterers outside the coop (some of my chickens take it upon themselves to free-range by flying the coop every morning!)

    2) rainwater harvesting to feed the storage tank, or an auxiliary tank

    3) use of either a birdbath heater or aquarium heater to prevent the water from freezing in the winter
     
  4. TN_BIRD

    TN_BIRD Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 15, 2011
    Looks like a great idea. Might even be worth looking in to capturing the rain water from the roof (I know that's got it's own set of issues, but it might be worth looking in to)

    If/when you ever find an 11/32 drill bit, let me know. I might need to borrow it from you (I can't find one at any of the hardware stores here, so I guess I'll have to do some online shopping)
     
  5. Sparky2726

    Sparky2726 Out Of The Brooder

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    Hiwassee, VA
    On the drillbit, check at Tractor Supply, or a specialty tool supply that has machine shop tools.

    Anyone used the cups instead of the nipples?

    Lee
     
  6. ralleia

    ralleia Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Omaha, NE
    Further research:

    Was trying to get an estimate on gallons per day required for 40 birds...

    I found figures in litres per 1000 layers at 90% capacity (whatever THAT means) of 270 litres per 1000 hens.

    40 is 1/25 of that so it means that roughly 12 litres a day would do it. That's 3.17 gallons a day.

    I'm looking at a 15 gallon tank or 25 gallon tank. These are transportable tanks--I wanted something more durable that could take any abuse that I would need to put them through in order to get them to work. Both tanks are 16" wide--the 15 gallon is 14" tall and 31" long. The 25 gallon is 18" tall and 34" long.

    Water weights roughly 8.3 #/gallon so the 15 gallon tank would weight about 137 lbs (including tank) and the 25 gallon would weight 220 lbs. However the tanks are mounted the location would need to support that kind of weight full-time.

    Other things to consider might be pressure regulators and in-line filtration.

    That's my research to the minute; now to feed the dog and then roam out to the chicken coop again with a tape measure and a camera.
     
  7. Allen095

    Allen095 Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 23, 2011
    East Texas
    I set up a system using a 5 gal bucket the water travels from the bucket through water hose into the pvc. I used 1 1/2 pvc to allow for adequate water around the nipples. I found a 3/8 drill bit will do fine and the nipples fit snug. I also apply silicone sealant around the nipples before threading them in. I water 14 eight week old chickens and use about 3 gal a day. I will post a pic when i get home later today.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2011
  8. kizanne

    kizanne Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 28, 2011
    Tallahassee, FL
    take your 5 gallon bucket at a toilet float to it and you have an endless automatic waterer that only needs to be cleaned occasionally to keep algae from growing.

    My hubby also added a valve and cap on the end of the PVC run after the nipples to make it easy to clean the pipe out if necessary and easy to empty the bucket if necessary. at the end of the cap is a standard hose attachment so that a hose can be attached and the water directed out of the coop without moving the bucket contraption.

    Seems to be working well except the nipples sometimes leak (small drip), which doesn't seem to be related to the autowaterer probably too much pressure.
     
  9. ralleia

    ralleia Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 22, 2011
    Omaha, NE
    Quote:I'm assuming that means using it to gather rainwater?

    Sorry if I'm a bit dense today--I woke up and found that my cat had vomited on the living room rug, the dog had crapped on the mudroom floor, and when I sent my seven-year-old (instead of me) to open the chickens' pop-door whilst I cleaned the messes she instead released all the chickens from the coop into the human yards.

    It was a very rugged start to my weekend.
     
  10. Allen095

    Allen095 Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 23, 2011
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    On the toilet float, you cut a hole in the bottom of the bucket and fit the toilet float in and tighten down the retaining nut. Then connect a water supply such as a garden hose from a faucet to it. When the water level in the bucket reaches the float level, the water will shut off just like in the toilet bowl.
     

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