Ava attacked and killed by predator

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by Duoas, Aug 30, 2010.

  1. Duoas

    Duoas Out Of The Brooder

    14
    0
    22
    Apr 19, 2010
    Last night an unknown predator (we think a fox or raccoon) got in to the chicken pen and killed one of our two Giant Pekin ducks, Ava. The evidence is that she fought valiantly. The survivor, Trouble, has been calling for her non-stop since then. He is so sad and it is breaking our hearts.

    We have him in the house with us now, but he is still barely consolable, naturally.

    We are concerned because he is vomiting some food (but not all), and his temperature is rather high, and he is frothing a little at the corners of the mouth.
    Is this to be expected?

    (All of the chickens were all able to jump up into the trees and escape serious harm.)

    Sorry for the sad news. Thank you for reading and helping.
     
  2. desertdarlene

    desertdarlene Chillin' With My Peeps

    4,479
    63
    248
    Aug 4, 2010
    San Diego
    Oh how sad! I went back and read some of your posts about Ava and Trouble. I'm sure everyone here is sad about the loss of Ava. I suggest that you take Trouble to a vet if she can't keep food and liquids down.
     
  3. KansasKid

    KansasKid Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 7, 2010
    South East Kansas
    I read somewhere that a ducks temperature was rather high compared to humans but i don't know about the frothing thing, best just to take to a vet.
    Hope he turns out ok.
     
  4. Sweetfolly

    Sweetfolly Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,123
    22
    191
    Apr 17, 2009
    Kildare, Wisconsin
    Quote:I'm pretty sure the average body temperature of birds in general is 105 degrees. [​IMG]

    Anyways, the vomiting and frothing thing that you're describing, Duoas, in my experience, is what a duck does when it's extremely scared and stressed. Is Trouble used to being in the house? That could actually be stressing him out more. I understand that you don't want to leave him out in a pen that a predator can break into....I guess I'd just try to keep him in a very quiet, calm, dimly lit area for a few days, to see if he gets any better. I'm sure the poor guy doesn't know what's going on. The best thing you can do is make him feel safe, and try to get things back to normal for him...as normal and things can be without Ava. [​IMG]
     
  5. Featherland

    Featherland Chillin' With My Peeps

    766
    5
    163
    Dec 28, 2007
    Missouri
    Sorry for your loss. [​IMG]
     
  6. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

    72,329
    42,386
    1,406
    May 3, 2009
    New Jersey
    Prepare your run and coop for another attack. Now that the predator has found your birds, it will continue coming back. The surviving duck is showing signs of stress from attack and change of environment.
     
  7. KansasKid

    KansasKid Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 7, 2010
    South East Kansas
    Quote:I'm pretty sure the average body temperature of birds in general is 105 degrees. [​IMG]

    Wow, that higher than i thought.
     
  8. Duoas

    Duoas Out Of The Brooder

    14
    0
    22
    Apr 19, 2010
    Thank you all for your kind words.

    Trouble and Ava are both accustomed to being inside, and they were imprinted on my wife and myself, so we think he is doing OK inside.

    He is doing a bit better now. He is calmer and not frothing at the moment, and he hasn't vomited for a couple hours. (He never did do too well with the harnass, so we've got him in the kitchen on the linoleum in the buff ATM.)

    He was a lot hotter than usual earlier. If he seems to get worse I'll take him to the vet.

    Thank you for your kindness, and I'll keep you all updated. (I still have to make a page with pictures of all our birds...)
     
  9. duckluv

    duckluv Overrun With Chickens

    Aug 20, 2010
    Ohio
    [​IMG]
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by