Average backyard flock size in Suburban area(s).. North Carolina, Charlotte ...

Discussion in 'Local Chicken Laws & Ordinances (and how to change' started by JBarringerNC, Dec 7, 2012.

  1. JBarringerNC

    JBarringerNC Chillin' With My Peeps

    Anyone on here from Charlotte, NC?
    If so, how many chickens are in your backyard flock?
     
  2. gmendoza

    gmendoza Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Rock Hill,SC
    Charlotte City Code Section 3-102: City Permits
    (a) Permit Required:
    It shall be unlawful for any person to own, keep, have, or maintain any equine animals, cloven-hoofed animals or other livestock or any chickens, turkeys, ducks, guineas, geese, pheasants, pigeons or other domestic fowl in the city without first receiving from the bureau a permit to do so or to continue to have any of such animals or fowl after a permit has been denied.
    This section shall not apply to, and no permit shall be required for, any agricultural operation within G.S. 106-700, which pertains to nuisance liability of agricultural operation, or to any rabbit that is kept exclusively inside its owner’s residence. The permit shall be valid for one year from the date of issuance and shall be renewed annually. The annual fee for such permit shall be $40.00 per household. The application shall list all such animals and fowl on the premises. Before a permit is issued an employee of the bureau shall inspect the premises to determine if the keeping of the animals or fowl on the premises will endanger or is likely to endanger the health, safety, peace, quiet, comfort, enjoyment of or otherwise become a public nuisance to nearby residents or occupants or places of business.
    (b) Denial:When a permit is denied for any reason, the applicant shall be given a written explanation of the reason for denial.
    (c) Compliance required prior to issuance: An owner or possessor of such animals or fowl shall comply with the following applicable subsections before a permit is issued. Compliance with the following applicable subsections will create a rebuttable presumption that a permit shall be issued. That presumption may only be rebutted by specific findings supported by competent evidence that, despite compliance with the following, the presence of such animals or fowl is still likely to endanger the health, safety, peace, quiet, comfort, enjoyment of or otherwise become a public nuisance to nearby residents or occupants or places of business:
    (1) Fowl and other specifically identified animals: The keeping of chickens, turkeys, ducks, guineas, geese, pheasants or other domestic fowl or rabbits shall be in compliance with the following:
    a. Such animals must be confined in a coop, fowl house or rabbit hutch not less than 18 inches in height. The fowl must be kept within the coop or fowl house and the rabbits in the hutch at all times.
    b. The coop or fowl house must be used for fowl only and the hutch for rabbits only, and both must be well ventilated.
    c. The coop, fowl house or hutch shall have a minimum of four square feet of floor area for each fowl or rabbit.
    d. The run must be well drained so there is no accumulation of moisture.
    e. The coop, fowl house or hutch shall be kept clean, sanitary and free from accumulation of animal excrement and objectionable odors. It shall be cleaned daily, and all droppings and body excretion shall be placed in a flyproof container and double-bagged in plastic bags.
    f. The coop, fowl house or hutch shall be a minimum of 25 feet from any property line.
    g. No more than 20 such fowl or rabbits shall be kept or maintained per acre. The number of fowl or rabbits should be proportionate to the acreage.
    (2) Pigeons: Pigeons, while allowed to fly to and from the premises, must be provided with adequate space on the premises, and sanitary conditions must be maintained.
    (3) Cloven-hoofed animals: The keeping of cloven-hoofed animals, equines and other livestock shall be in compliance with the following:
    a. Such animals must be provided with adequate shelter to protect them from the elements.
    b. The shelter shall be kept clean, sanitary and free from accumulations of animal excrement and objectionable odors.
    c. The shelters for cows and other large livestock, which are covered by the zoning ordinance in appendix A to this Code, shall be kept at a minimum of 75 feet from any property line. The shelters for goats and other small livestock shall be kept at a minimum of 25 feet from any property line.
    d. Each cow or other large livestock, excluding equines, shall have a minimum pasture area of two acres. Each goat, sheep or other small livestock shall have a minimum pasture area of one-fourth acre.
    (4) Slaughter: Any slaughter of any livestock or poultry not regulated by state law or otherwise forbidden or regulated shall be done only in a humane and sanitary manner and shall not be done open to the view of any public area or adjacent property owned by another.
    (5) Annexation: An owner or possessor of animals on property that is newly annexed has 90 days from the date of annexation to bring the property into compliance and to have obtained permits required by this section.
    (6) Exceptions: A permit shall not be required for animals of any kind if the animals are kept by a governmental authority or other appropriately certified and recognized academic institution, museum, raptor center, etc.
    (d) Revocation: The bureau may revoke any permit:
    (1) When the permit has been mistakenly issued without compliance with this section;
    (2) When the applicant has submitted false information;
    (3) For a violation of any of the sections of this chapter;
    (4) When, in the opinion of the bureau manager, the health, safety or welfare of any person or property is menaced by the keeping of such animals; or
    (5) When the animals become a nuisance.
    If a permit is revoked, the applicant shall be given a written explanation of the reasons for the revocation. Upon the determination of a violation of this section, and if the violation pertains to a correctable condition on the property, the owner shall have 30 days in which to bring the property or condition into compliance with this chapter
     
  3. JBarringerNC

    JBarringerNC Chillin' With My Peeps

    So....
    How many chickens do you have in your flock ?

    I'm in Charlotte, NC and yes 20-25 chickens is the max. I'm well under that.. with only 5 chicks
    i'll be well under the radar of the chicken patrol.
     
  4. gmendoza

    gmendoza Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 23, 2010
    Rock Hill,SC
    well I live in Rock hill and I have 40+. I did have over 100 in May of this year, but widdled down and sold some too.Rock Hill has no limits or per size of acres.

    but there was one guy who got busted for having over 150 chickens in his backyard, so I'll keep it under 150! [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  5. soulman232

    soulman232 New Egg

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    Dec 2, 2012
    Charlotte NC
    I live in Charlotte. I am currently raising 10 hen "chicks" . The coop is done but the run is not quite ready. JbarringerNC did you get a permit? I have not applied for one yet. I didn't know we needed one till I was we'll under way with the coop. Now I am afraid I will get denied. Then what am I going to do? My neighborhood is old school Charlotte......2 acre lot. So I really don't think the neighbors, will even know, let alone have an issue.
     
  6. JBarringerNC

    JBarringerNC Chillin' With My Peeps

    Man I wish we had 2 acres, we're on 1/3 acre..

    I never did get a permit (don't plan to either) .. You know it's just another way for the city to get extra money out of their tax payers!
    I'm not into paying the city just to have a pet, and I don't think they should have the authority to charge for this any way.

    We live in North Charlotte and our neighborhood doesn't have an HOA and I don't think my neighbors will complain about it, if they do then i'll cross that bridge when I get there.

    The way I look at it is that if their dogs can bark every single morning and wake me up on the weekends then I'll have my Rooster do the same! [​IMG]

    I currently have 4 chicks, and I'll probably get 4 more chicks soon.
    And i'll hopefully have 1 rooster out of the bunch, my coop is too small.. and i'm in the process of finalizing the build. it'll be a few months before their even ready to be in it so i've got plenty of time.

    ----If I were you i'd just make your own decision on wether or not a permit is best for you.
     
  7. 20736

    20736 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 6, 2012
    Having a permit on file will protect you from new neighbors who move in and don't like chickens, as well as providing protection/relief from dogs in your neighborhood.
    We don't need a permit here, but if we did I would probably get one for those reasons.
     
  8. soulman232

    soulman232 New Egg

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    Dec 2, 2012
    Charlotte NC
    My two next door neighbors are aware of my endeavor and can't wait to get some eggs. So they won't be a problem. But there is an elderly lady who lives directly behind me, but her house is probably 150 yards from the back of my property line. I think for sanity sake I will just get the permit. But I agree about the city and the extra "fee income" Best of luck with your chicks!
     
  9. JBarringerNC

    JBarringerNC Chillin' With My Peeps

    Yeah, I know what you mean.. It would not be a bad idea I guess.
    But once you get the 1st one their gonna know you've got chickens for sure.. then you've gotta deal with the inspection of the coop/run, etc.. and all
    the other BS that comes with applying for the permit.
    And I'm sure each year they'll send you a letter just to remind you that its time to pay the piper again, and to send them their $40.
     

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