Avian Pox Questions! Can somebody help?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by littleredhen, Oct 30, 2007.

  1. littleredhen

    littleredhen New Egg

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    Sep 1, 2007
    Saugus, California
    My three hens apparently have the avian pox. They are five and six years old, no longer lay, but other than the scabby lesions, seem normal.
    My questions are the following:
    1. I have no other chickens to contaminate. I heard the virus can be passed to other birds in bedding through scabs. If this is true, is it okay to let them out into the yard, or will they somehow contaminate it for other furture chickens?
    2. What do I need to do to "disinfect" the coop when the lesions are gone, to insure future birds don't get this?[​IMG]
     
  2. eggchel

    eggchel Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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  3. littleredhen

    littleredhen New Egg

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    Sep 1, 2007
    Saugus, California
    I've read this link and many others, but they still don't explain everything.
    Can this be transmitted to wild birds?
    Also, if I let my chickens out into the yard, will the yard be somehow contaminated for future birda?
     
  4. eggchel

    eggchel Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    I dont know whether wild birds get fowl pox or not, but if they do, it may be a different strain.

    Yes, if you let the birds out into the yard before they are fully recovered and while there is still viable infectious debris in their coop that could be spread to the yard. However, although the article indicated that they will not be carriers, I dont know how long it will take before the premises no longer are contaminated.

    Also, if mosquitos spread the disease, and there are other flocks in your area, then you may have new birds infected by an outside source. In that case, you may need to vaccinate any new birds.

    Chel
     

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