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Aviary netting and predators????

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by mominoz, Mar 15, 2011.

  1. mominoz

    mominoz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have seen some aviaries and pens with 'real' aviary netting. Some of the aviaries seem to be by professional breeders. Having had raccoon problems in the past.....I wonder how this netting fairs with coons???? Anybody know? I have built Fort Knox and with electric fence too . I am thinking of a large aviary later for exhibition fowl, but wonder how even with the knotted net how it fairs against coons as many have said they can chew through chicken wire and pull birds through other fences....? They seem to have other fence along the sidew , even sight barriers, but only netting on top.....(the real stuff) ...[​IMG]
     
  2. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    There is more than one type of "real" aviary netting. I have seen product labels saying "aviary nettting" on

    1) 1/2" x 1" welded cage wire
    2) chicken wire with 1/2" openings (rather than the more common 1" or 2")
    3) poly mesh in various "wire" gauges and shapes.
     
  3. mominoz

    mominoz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I mean the knotted or woven treated for UVB rays that you buy from Aviary/fencing supply companies that can come in hundreds of square feet. Like 50 x100 or 100 X 200 or smaller , usually a polypropolene or polyethelene (sp?). Not the stuff you get at walmart ...
     
  4. WoodlandWoman

    WoodlandWoman Overrun With Chickens

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    Do they have dogs? Do they set traps every night? People handle security in different ways.
     
  5. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Quote:I'm not talking walmart, either. The "cage wire" and "1/2" chicken wire" come in long rolls of 25' up to at least 100' and various widths. The largest I have seen is 6' wide, but they may make wider ones that can be special ordered--never had a need or interest. My point was that there are a lot of products that are not the same, but have the same or very similar names, so it can be really difficult to know exactly what one is dealing with going strictly by name. Lots of folks say chicken wire is very easy to break through--part of that depends on the gauge. Likewise folks say hardware cloth is much sturdier. Once again, it depends on the gauge. Most of the hardware cloth I see has a MUCH thinner gauge than the cage wire I see.

    In general, smaller holes and heavier gauge is stronger. Method of attachment is equally important. You can have super heavy duty material, but if it is not securely attached offers less protection than lighter duty materials that are securely attached.

    I would think that the polypropolene or polyethelene is less strong a material, and could be chewed through by a raccoon or weasel or similar predator. It should be quite effective against birds of prey, but likely not against climbing mammals, particularly ones with dexterous claws and sharp teeth. Also, how is it attached? If you use wire ties, chances are that they also can be chewed through.

    Since you have a KNOWN raccoon problem, I would recommend a heavy duty cage wire for the top, and I would probably make sure that any roosts are sufficiently lower than the top of the aviary that even the tallest bird is out of reach of a raccoon's arm. You might be able to get away using the poly netting by electrifying the aviary sides near the top--as long as the raccoons cannot jump down onto the netting from a tree or other structure.
     

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