[b] Q's!!!!!!!!!!!!!![/b]

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by t-dawg, Jul 10, 2008.

  1. t-dawg

    t-dawg Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 12, 2008
    Boston
    hi, this is t-dawg, and i have a few questions for people. Scence i had chickens ALONG TIME AGO (*cough, cough when i was 10, cough,cough*) I have parts to these questions. if you could when you answer, put EX. part 1), part 2), ect. ok [​IMG]

    Q#1) For an incubator, could you use a heating pad(electric)? i don't remember where i heard this, but someone said it works. does it? [​IMG]

    Q#2) I though that if you turn over the egg completely during candling or turning, don't they die? [​IMG]

    Q#3) After the eggs hatch, do they need to stay in there 'bator? If they do, how long? :eek:

    Q#4) What is the differnece to a 'bator and a hatching 'bator? [​IMG]
     
  2. t-dawg

    t-dawg Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 12, 2008
    Boston
    Q#4) What is pipping? [​IMG]
     
  3. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    May 7, 2007
    Forks, Virginia
    Quote:Yes, i have heard of it working. Ed in NZ used one for his first hatch.

    Quote:No they don't die. Just be careful and don't be rough when handling them. Gentle. Gentle.

    Quote:The chicks can stay in about 24 hours. Dry and fluffy and ready for the warm brooder box you have waiting.

    Quote:No difference. A bator can be a hatcher but a specific commercial made hatcher cannot be a bator.

    Quote:The first tiny little crack andhole you see when the chicks are starting to hatch.
     
  4. perfectly_polish

    perfectly_polish Overrun With Chickens

    Mar 1, 2007
    CT
    Quote:Q#1) No you should not use a heating pad for an incubator, the temp. and humidity would not be stable, you need to buy an incubator, they have cheap styrofoam ones from GQF, that work pretty good.

    Q#2) If you don't have an automatic turner the eggs need to be hand turned 3-5 times a day, if not turned the embryo will stick to one side of the eggs and won't get "exercise" and won't be strong enough to hatch. Candling is when you take a flash light or other bright lite to see inside the eggs.

    Q#3) After the eggs hatch you should have a brooder with a heat lamp, chick starter, and fresh water. An incubator should only be used for incubating/hatching not brooding.

    Q#4) There is no difference between and incubator and a hatcher. If you have staggered hatches in one incubator you probably want another incubator to put eggs that are hatching in. But a hatcher is just another incubator and not necessary.
     
  5. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Forks, Virginia
    Q#4) There is no difference between and incubator and a hatcher. If you have staggered hatches in one incubator you probably want another incubator to put eggs that are hatching in. But a hatcher is just another incubator and not necessary.

    A commercially produced hatcher is not exactly the same as a incubator. These small ones we use and make homemade can be interchanged as bator and hatcher but there is a difference.​
     
  6. perfectly_polish

    perfectly_polish Overrun With Chickens

    Mar 1, 2007
    CT
    Quote:There are 2 types of pips, an internal pip and an external pip. An internal pip is when the chick pokes a hole through the air sac and starts using it's lungs to breathe. An external pip is when you can see a crack in the shell. The chick may then rest for 2-12 hours and start to zip, which is when they turn themselves and brake the shell around and then push out.
     
  7. perfectly_polish

    perfectly_polish Overrun With Chickens

    Mar 1, 2007
    CT
    Quote:A commercially produced hatcher is not exactly the same as a incubator. These small ones we use and make homemade can be interchanged as bator and hatcher but there is a difference.

    Oh okay. I just thought he was getting confused because some of us say we are moving the eggs to the hatcher, when most of us mean just another incubator.
     
  8. Akane

    Akane Overrun With Chickens

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    Jun 15, 2008
    Q#1) For an incubator, could you use a heating pad(electric)? i don't remember where i heard this, but someone said it works. does it

    Potentially you could. People have used all sorts of odd things to incubate eggs. Try the electric skillet thread. However the odds go down. Especially if you don't know what your doing. Incubators are setup so that hopefully you only have to follow the instructions and turn a little dial to keep humidity and temperature at the right levels. It doesn't always work perfectly but it's easier for beginners. The people who successfully hatch using other things usually already know how to control humidity and temp without it being laid out for them or they just get really lucky. If your paying for eggs to hatch you probably don't want to rely on luck so you're best off buying an incubator.​
     
  9. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    24,442
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    May 7, 2007
    Forks, Virginia
  10. perfectly_polish

    perfectly_polish Overrun With Chickens

    Mar 1, 2007
    CT
    Quote:I recommend it to. I have 2 1588's and a turbo fan, I use the turbo fan for a hatcher when I have staggered hatches but the 1588 works fantastic!
     

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