Baby chick is extremely lethargic and breathing heavy

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by justinetaza, Mar 12, 2018.

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  1. justinetaza

    justinetaza In the Brooder

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    Mar 6, 2017
    Woodstock, GA
    just picked up 5 assorted bantams probably about 5 days old. One seems much bigger than the rest and I suspect it’s not a bantam, however, she’s not doing well today. This is not my first time raising chicks. I have a large container, ventilated on top, shavings on the floor and a red heat bulb at a constant 90-95 degrees at one end. Free food/clean water at all times and plenty of space to roam and get out from under the heat bulb. That being said my other 4 bantams are doing perfect. Chirping and scratching about. After about 3 days I noticed my big girl sleeping on her side, breathing pretty heavy, and when I went to pick her up she’s limp but very much alive still. Even let out a chirp. I’ve removed her from right under the heat in case she was too hot, and offered her some electrolyte water but she will not drink. No one is picking on her or anything but she will not snap out of it. Occasionally I see her spaz like she’s trying to get up but cannot stand at all. What should I do?
     
  2. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Free Ranging

    Hi. :frow

    Sorry your chick is having trouble. :(

    Have you checked for pasty butt?

    Gotta hold that babe in your hand, beak facing your forefinger and drip a drop of the electrolytes just below the nostrils and chick should gobble when it roll around into the mouth. The bend in my finger helps capture and direct the drops. I would try 2-3 drops/gobbles each 15 minutes until I see improvement. And if I have it a direct drop of liquid vitamins or poultry nutri drench.

    How does the crop feel? Empty, full, hard, squishy? How's the poo? Are they on shavings?

    BY the time I see this behavior, I usually consider it failure to thrive and cull instead of letting them slowly starve. Without serious intervention this chick will fail soon. And sometimes even when we do our best to help they will still fail. :barnie

    For my bantams I crush my crumbles a little extra for a couple weeks.

    :fl
     
  3. justinetaza

    justinetaza In the Brooder

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    0
    10
    Mar 6, 2017
    Woodstock, GA
    Crop feels empty, they are on shavings. I have been dropping vitamin water into her beak, a drop or two about every 10 mins. She just seems like she’s fighting and hanging on but I feel you may be right about about failure to thrive. She seems to be crinking her neck to the left, but it will move freely when I go to pick her back up and doesn’t feel broken or anything. She’s just laying here breathing heavy.
    Hoping she improves. Thank you for the advice.
     
  4. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Free Ranging

    The heavy breathing may be symptom of the internal system failure. :(

    What kind of vitamins are you using?

    Empty crop, not pecking at food at 8-10 days old, can't survive. You can try tube feeding to get some energy on board. That's beyond my current skill set. And since I breed for vigor I won't go that far to save a chick as I don't want the weakness in my flock. But many have been successful at it, if it's important to you.

    Some will use raw egg yolk as a last ditch effort, since that is what they survive on for a few days after hatch, it must have the nutrients to sustain them. Do this at your own discretion though, preferably from your own flock. I know salmonella might be a *possibility*... but if it's life and death already, I'm not sure you've got anything to lose.

    Hope she is doing better, miraculous recoveries do happen sometimes! :fl
     

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