Baby chicken: swollen hock. Rooster: lethargic, eyes closed

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Miyu, Jan 30, 2017.

  1. Miyu

    Miyu New Egg

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    Sep 27, 2015
    I am having two issues. I was about to post about the first issue a little bit earlier, but had to stop midpost due to it being time to put the rest of thr animals away for the night, when I noticed thr second problem.

    1. I have an approximately 4 week old baby chicken with a swollen hock, and possibly twisted leg. This chick got its leg stuck while inside thr incubator and I had to tagteam open the incubator and unstick thr chick, before it got drafty, because another baby had hatched and wasn't fluffed up yet. This chick, when removed from the incubator and into thr brooder, I noticed it seemed to have developed splayed leg, so I braced it with a figure eight rubber band, with a bit of straw in-between the legs. Thr brace was on for about a week, and only removed once thr chicken could walk and move normally. Problem fixed! I thought. Fast forward to yesterday when I'm cleaning their home, and I pick it up, and notice heat in thr leg and a swollen hock, which doesn't seem to bend properly. I'm not sure what thr issue is, it doesn't seem to be a pulled tendon, but I'm not an expert. I added vitamins provided by the feed store, designed for baby chicks, and diluted with water. It appears to eat and drink normally, I just want to know what I can do - if anything for this chick.

    2. I have a four month old rooster, who I found lethargic, eyes closed, and tail down. Just laying on the ground. When it was time to feed them for thr night tonight. He got up with a little prodding, and pecked at thr food, but very carefree, not like he was hungry. I pulled him out, and gave him vitamin water, same as thr baby chick. I checked him over as best that I could for mites, but didn't see anything. He didn't seem yo care that I was handling him, until I tried to orally give him a few drops of vitamin water, then he fought back. But halfheartedly. I gave him a 1/2 ml of dewormer, Valbazen; which I already had on hand for our goats and sheep. I out him back in his medical home, and he pooped a not very solid poop, that was average green. I'm not sure what else to do for him.

    I'm currently trying to give my mind a rest from animal emergency care because it has been a doozy for our animals in thr last 1.5 weeks. Started off with our male goat needing emergency surgery due to a stone in his urethra, two and three days later, a new neighbor dog came and attacked our flock, killing half and injuring four, three of which could be saved - just a few stitches. But since then, I'm been administering antibiotics and pain meds to these three as prescribed by the vet. Thankfully the dog owner took responsibility and compensated us. Anyhow, I'm almost mentally exhausted by, by animal emergencies. For thr last two years, we have had zero issues with our animals - until now.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2017
  2. Miyu

    Miyu New Egg

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    Sep 27, 2015
    I tried posting pictures, but for whatever reason, they didn't seem to work in the OP.
    [​IMG]
    ^ baby chicken with swollen hock. Was a bit camera shy.

    [​IMG]
    ^ closer up of the hock

    [​IMG]
    ^ Roosters poop
     
  3. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    southern Ohio
    I would keep watch on the chick with the swollen hock. Since he has had trouble before, it could be a repeat of same, but leg bone deformities such as varus valgus deformity, tibial dyschondroplasia, can lead to tendon problems in one or both legs. Sprains or arthritis might be also considered. Keep up with the vitamins, and even consider a vitamin and mineral supplement. Rooster Booster has one for the feed and Poultry Cell or Nutri-drench for oral use. This is a good article on leg bone deformities:
    http://www.thepoultrysite.com/articles/1051/leg-health-in-large-broilers/
    With your rooster, it may be best to try ruling out a crop impaction or sour crop, worms or coccidia infection which can be tested by taking some fresh droppings into your vet, and giving him some probiotics to help him fight off whatever is going on. Look around in case he could have eaten moldy food or decaying vegetation or something else to make him sick.
     
  4. Miyu

    Miyu New Egg

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    Sep 27, 2015
    Thank you. I was planning on visiting the vet this morning with poop samples, just waiting until they open. There is only one in the area that has experience with chickens, though I know any vet can do the tests.

    Rooster is more perky this morning . Moving around more, and trying to cockadoodle doo. He is still at that age where he is beginning to cockadoodle doo. He eyes still close periodically, but he definately looks a smidge more alert than he did last night. I'll look around their space, will be easier in the daylight.

    Thank you.
     

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