Baby lambs!!!!

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by DUCKGIRL89, Oct 20, 2011.

  1. DUCKGIRL89

    DUCKGIRL89 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 28, 2011
    TN
    So when my moms sheep have their babies my mom is gonna let me bottle feed one! I guess this will be a early birthday present!

    BTW I the reason my mom is taking the lamb off the mom is because all the sheep have hoof rot! [​IMG] thats when the sheeps hooves start to break away slowly and is VERY hard to cure [​IMG] so all the babies will be taken off the moms so the babies hooves can be saved [​IMG]
     
  2. carolinagirl58

    carolinagirl58 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 30, 2011
    Lugoff, SC
    Quote:so how will you keep the babies from getting hoof rot? Do you have clean pastures to put them in, where the affected sheep have never been? It is transmitted through the soil. Even if they are away from their mothers, they can still get it if they walk on the same ground their mothers walked on, or if you walk through the mother's pasture and then into their pasture. It is very contagious.
     
  3. DUCKGIRL89

    DUCKGIRL89 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 28, 2011
    TN
    Quote:so how will you keep the babies from getting hoof rot? Do you have clean pastures to put them in, where the affected sheep have never been? It is transmitted through the soil. Even if they are away from their mothers, they can still get it if they walk on the same ground their mothers walked on, or if you walk through the mother's pasture and then into their pasture. It is very contagious.

    They will be going in a pasture that is sevral hundren feet away. In with our (uninfected) goat pasture. Where the sheep have never been in.
     
  4. kfacres

    kfacres Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I hate to tell you, but footrot is cureable, although it has a genetic linkage. Pulling lambs off their dam, is completely unneeded, and could be considered animal crulty to some. Taking into account the genetic linkage, you're pulling lambs off their mother, which highly likely will develop footrot anyways later in life.

    Footrot lives in the soil for one, and for another- it'll pass from one generation to another through the DNA=-- try seperating that out?

    Seems to me that your management is likely lacking, and by adding another harsh stepping stone into it, I'd say it will further lack...
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2011
  5. Evelle

    Evelle Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 27, 2011
    North Idaho
    Quote:try again... farmers take babys away at birth for numerious reasons... to increase milk supply, to help sat animal to imprint on humans not mother to make better show animals.. i have never heard it being "animal crulty" to bottel feed livestock. hence why there is sooooo much bottles and milk at F&F stores.

    plus she did not say anything about hoofrot being incureable
    very hard to cure​
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2011
  6. kfacres

    kfacres Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:try again... farmers take babys away at birth for numerious reasons... to increase milk supply, to help sat animal to imprint on humans not mother to make better show animals.. i have never heard it being "animal crulty" to bottel feed livestock. hence why there is sooooo much bottles and milk at F&F stores.

    don't preach to somebody who lives on a dairy cattle farm, and raises about 70 ewes, plus many other head of livestock...

    That's why I said to 'some'... remember this is a public forum, and we don't want the pETA people getting any publicity for their stunts.
     
  7. Evelle

    Evelle Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 27, 2011
    North Idaho
    just please inform rather than judge [​IMG] thank you
    we are all learning and none of us are perfict including myself [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2011
  8. kfacres

    kfacres Chillin' With My Peeps

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    hey not a problem... just trying to get people to realize this is a public forum- and some things either need not said, or said in a different manor.

    Actually, I do feel that pulling those lambs off their mother is a poor management decision, and the ewe having footrot to the extreme that she would be unable to raise a pair, or single lamb, is terrible management. Not once, am i saying that my ewes do not get footrot, but I assure you that when they do-- I struggle to live with myself if I don't get some meds in them to cure that problem.

    I hinted at footrot being genetic, which it is.. Austrailia has developed a genetic susceptablility test to determine the degree of susceptability that that particular sheep possesses.
     
  9. zzGypsy

    zzGypsy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 8, 2011
    Quote:try again... farmers take babys away at birth for numerious reasons... to increase milk supply, to help sat animal to imprint on humans not mother to make better show animals.. i have never heard it being "animal crulty" to bottel feed livestock. hence why there is sooooo much bottles and milk at F&F stores.

    don't preach to somebody who lives on a dairy cattle farm, and raises about 70 ewes, plus many other head of livestock...

    That's why I said to 'some'... remember this is a public forum, and we don't want the pETA people getting any publicity for their stunts.

    ... nor do we want people getting the idea that their questions and requests for feedback will be met with harsh criticism either. don't know how it was intended but your comment did read rather sharp.

    not intrested in boxing with you, just noting that pulling baby animals and bottle feeding them is not essentially cruel, it is a management decision, with benefits and consequences that have to be considered in specific context. and besides that, if we were kowtowing to what PETA people *might* think, should they happen on this site, we might as well all just quit keeping animals, logoff, pack up and go home now. I'm not worried about the PETA folks, the OP is the one who's here looking for information.

    to the OP:
    it is possible to treat hoof rot, but it's a task that requires quite a bit of effort. Listened to a lecture last weekend by a farmer who has successfully erradicated hoof rot in his 300+ sheep, it was rampant in their flock 3 years ago. this year he's been hoof-rot free, on the same land. but he says it was a LOT of work and required a significant change in their management practices.

    if your lambs are born on the ground thier moms are walking on, and the moms have active hoof rot, they're already exposed. moving them to the other pasture may work, or they may just bring the contamination with them. if you are not exercising good bio-security practices after being where the moms have been, before going where the lambs will be, chances are the area already has the hoof rot bacteria in the dirt. my suggestion is you get with your vet, or the extension office's livestock expert and go over your management to see what can be done to reduce the problem overall. simply separating the lambs may not be enough.
     
  10. kfacres

    kfacres Chillin' With My Peeps

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    footrot is a disease, that you cannot really ever erradicate it once you have it, but you can control it with antibodic shots, foot baths, pasture rotation, cleanliness of barn lots, etc... also the genetic advancements will help tremendously in the future.

    I will not get into the specifics of treating it, unless you want me to, and then PM me.

    First you need to determine if it's footrot, or foot scald- most often confused with each other. footrot occurs in dry areas and times, scald the opposite. both are kinda in the same family, but do completely different things to the foot. in severe cases, the sheep actually has both problems.

    if it's b/w the toes, white, crusty, smells... it's scald.. if the hoof is black and rotten, it's rot. almost every sheep and goat in the world has a mild form of hoofrot- especially if they need a foot trimming. It's not the contagious variety..

    On a personal note, both can be controlled with management. scald especially-- scald is most often associated with a poor immune system-- get healthy sheep, and more than likely you'll have fewer scald problems...

    To me, I see a better management with fixing the current problem, the best solution, and preventing the future problems from occuring... do you want to bottle feed every lamb, or do you want a flock free (er) of footrot?
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2011

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