Baby Reeves

Discussion in 'Pheasants and Partridge (Chukar)' started by lobojoe, May 24, 2010.

  1. lobojoe

    lobojoe In the Brooder

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    Jan 31, 2010
    Seattle
    I just hatched out a dozen baby Reeves along with a bunch of ring necks (all hatched at the same time) my question is; are Reeves normaly lees active as other pheasant chicks? my guys just like to take life in the slow lane as my ring nicks seems to be in the fast lane one set bounces off the wall and the other sets back and watches *LOL*
     
  2. FeatheredObsessions

    FeatheredObsessions Songster

    May 24, 2010
    Oregon
    I don't know about Reeves but my ring neck are far more active than my red golden chicks. I'm sure someone with Reeves will chime in too though.
     
  3. Reeves

    Reeves In the Brooder

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    Dec 23, 2009
    Normally you cannot brood Reeves with any other species due to their extream aggressiveness.

    When you are not watching, all heck may very well break out.
     
  4. lobojoe

    lobojoe In the Brooder

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    Jan 31, 2010
    Seattle
    thats funny I would never have known that by watching my little guys. Then again I was told how aggressive Reeves are but my male is so timid he eats peanuts out of your hand. granted by looking at his spurs I would not want him to come after me. I was thinking of seperating my ring neck chicks from the reeves chicks this week so as to keep the ring necks from running over the reeves and bouncing into them all the time.[​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2010
  5. Resolution

    Resolution Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Arrow Pheasants aka "Reeves Pheasants" are smart, inquisitive and a bit retiring as chicks probably because they are true forest species. Ringnecked pheasants are brushland adapted species and hence need to be much more active. Ringnecked pheasants do not generally live to the same age as Reeves Pheasants in nature at any rate.

    Something I strongly suggest for anyone raising pheasant chicks is to purchase a decent wild bird seed cake to keep the chicks occupied and stimulated.
    This is a method that you can guarantee will work against bullying and feather pecking, cannibalism etc..

    The smaller the seed the better for the younger birds. Once they have feathered out, select a wild bird seed cake that has larger pieces in it, for example one designed for woodpeckers. This enables the birds to run with their treasures once they've unlocked them from the cake -with the inevitable rugby match that ensues afterward.
     

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