Baby Silkie Chicks look young for 4 weeks?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by PaleoChicken, Sep 3, 2013.

  1. PaleoChicken

    PaleoChicken New Egg

    5
    0
    7
    Aug 29, 2013
    I am scared that they aren't growing well and I want your opinion. I have been feeding them quinoa, ground flaxseed, cornmeal, Oats, and grit mixed together for there feed? I really wanna know if they are doing alright? Here is a few pics:[​IMG]
     
  2. PaleoChicken

    PaleoChicken New Egg

    5
    0
    7
    Aug 29, 2013
    [​IMG]
     
  3. PaleoChicken

    PaleoChicken New Egg

    5
    0
    7
    Aug 29, 2013
    [​IMG]
     
  4. PaleoChicken

    PaleoChicken New Egg

    5
    0
    7
    Aug 29, 2013
    [​IMG]
     
  5. Veer67

    Veer67 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Do you have chick starter feed and a feeder for the chicks? I'm not sure but I think that feeding your silkies quinoa, ground flaxseed, cornmeal, Oats, and grit might not have enough nutrients which could be why your chicks are still a bit young for 4 weeks.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2013
  6. PaleoChicken

    PaleoChicken New Egg

    5
    0
    7
    Aug 29, 2013
    I don't have any chick starter but i do have a chick feeder. I was thinking that maybe they arent getting enough protein but quinoa and flaxseed is suppose to have a very large amount of protein. I had stopped putting vitamins in there water at about 2 1/2 weeks but yesterday I started putting them back in. They seem really active and eat a huge amount of the feed I make them.
     
  7. Veer67

    Veer67 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Well they look about the age they should be, different silkies grow at different rates. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2013
  8. howfunkyisurchicken

    howfunkyisurchicken Overrun With Chickens

    9,279
    729
    321
    Apr 11, 2011
    Tn
    They look fine to me :) As an ornamental breed, Silkies take a little longer to grow than a production or meat breed. Mine usually feather out somewhere around 8-9 weeks, as opposed to the 5-6 week mark, which seems to be normal for most production type birds.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by