Bachelor Pad for Roosters?

QueenC3

Chirping
Nov 12, 2018
47
103
79
Missouri
Right now we have a total of 5 roosters and 17 hens. We had 8 roosters but luckily were able to rehome them. We haven’t had as much luck with the rest.

My question is, can you show me your rooster coops? How do you manage them? Are they separated from hens at all times? Free-range together?

We have plans to try and get down to 3 roosters at most but f that doesn’t happen before they start acting like crazy 14 year old boys...



any advice is appreciated.

We have :
2 EE
RIR
DOMINIQUE
L.BRAHAMA
 

EggSighted4Life

Crossing the Road
5 Years
Apr 9, 2016
14,342
19,906
832
California's Redwood Coast
My question is, can you show me your rooster coops? How do you manage them? Are they separated from hens at all times? Free-range together?
Many peeps keep bachelor pads, me included. I keep mine... for eating and breeding only. But some people have the means to consider them pets fully. Mine are treated well still. Anyways...

My stock load goes up and down because all boys who hatch act like the crazed teens you mention before they meet their destiny. SO in order to control over mating and genetics.. all my boys stay together.

Their coop is attached to my hens', divided by a wire wall. The outdoor run and pastures are divided by a 4 ft tall wire fence (chain link is best), and extra secured by an E wire at comb and waddle height... only takes once or twice before they QUICKLY learn to respect the E fence. Yes I tried it myself so I could know what they are feeling! :p

When I want fertile eggs... I swap a rooster (not cockerels because I'm picky) into my hen coop after dark and back to the other boy coop after dark the next night or sooner.. so he doesn't lose his place in the cock pecking order. Anytime a removal takes place or someone finds a new home... havoc usually breaks out short term while a new order is established.

I move new grow outs from my hatching into the stag pen as soon as they are off heat (or mama) and identifiable as male. In this way older boys accept them easily as they are not yet competition. Some even give them treat and such.

My current stag coop and pen is 12x12 indoors and maybe 2000 sq feet out doors, some covered. My max load is around 25 full size boys, but not long term. My long term keepers are more like 6 or 8 boys. Sometimes more is better because it's more like rooster ping pong instead of any one jerk being able to bully for too long.

So far all have been individuals. And I cull for attitude first and foremost.. as I want a peaceful flock that brings me joy in addition to it does breed forward and I do hatch.

I also have smaller coops and pens I use for various reasons, mostly controlling genetics when I want to hatch something specific or project. A plain fence will not work to keep boys from fighting. They get injured through the fence. And often, my boys who are fine when together will fight through the fence and be fine when back together again. Simple E wire works well.

Sorry no pics... too little memory on my devices. :he

The two main coops I talk about are the back of my pole barn divided with pop doors that open from the outside into their respective pastures. I will mention that keep bantam and large fowl roosters together. I only separate my bantam hens from the large fowl when I pout a large fowl rooster in for breeding to prevent ACCIDENTAL injury.. love knows no size. :bun :lol:

Good luck finding homes! :fl

No shame in letting them go to feed someone else's family or pets, even if it isn't right for you. Many of us will do it as quickly and humanely possible so it's over fast. We know our animals had a very good life and one bad moment. ;)
 

QueenC3

Chirping
Nov 12, 2018
47
103
79
Missouri
Many peeps keep bachelor pads, me included. I keep mine... for eating and breeding only. But some people have the means to consider them pets fully. Mine are treated well still. Anyways...

My stock load goes up and down because all boys who hatch act like the crazed teens you mention before they meet their destiny. SO in order to control over mating and genetics.. all my boys stay together.

Their coop is attached to my hens', divided by a wire wall. The outdoor run and pastures are divided by a 4 ft tall wire fence (chain link is best), and extra secured by an E wire at comb and waddle height... only takes once or twice before they QUICKLY learn to respect the E fence. Yes I tried it myself so I could know what they are feeling! :p

When I want fertile eggs... I swap a rooster (not cockerels because I'm picky) into my hen coop after dark and back to the other boy coop after dark the next night or sooner.. so he doesn't lose his place in the cock pecking order. Anytime a removal takes place or someone finds a new home... havoc usually breaks out short term while a new order is established.

I move new grow outs from my hatching into the stag pen as soon as they are off heat (or mama) and identifiable as male. In this way older boys accept them easily as they are not yet competition. Some even give them treat and such.

My current stag coop and pen is 12x12 indoors and maybe 2000 sq feet out doors, some covered. My max load is around 25 full size boys, but not long term. My long term keepers are more like 6 or 8 boys. Sometimes more is better because it's more like rooster ping pong instead of any one jerk being able to bully for too long.

So far all have been individuals. And I cull for attitude first and foremost.. as I want a peaceful flock that brings me joy in addition to it does breed forward and I do hatch.

I also have smaller coops and pens I use for various reasons, mostly controlling genetics when I want to hatch something specific or project. A plain fence will not work to keep boys from fighting. They get injured through the fence. And often, my boys who are fine when together will fight through the fence and be fine when back together again. Simple E wire works well.

Sorry no pics... too little memory on my devices. :he

The two main coops I talk about are the back of my pole barn divided with pop doors that open from the outside into their respective pastures. I will mention that keep bantam and large fowl roosters together. I only separate my bantam hens from the large fowl when I pout a large fowl rooster in for breeding to prevent ACCIDENTAL injury.. love knows no size. :bun :lol:

Good luck finding homes! :fl

No shame in letting them go to feed someone else's family or pets, even if it isn't right for you. Many of us will do it as quickly and humanely possible so it's over fast. We know our animals had a very good life and one bad moment. ;)
Thank you so much!
 

Trish1974

Araucana enthusiast
5 Years
Mar 16, 2016
3,079
6,857
592
North Central IN
My Coop
My Coop
Their coop is attached to my hens', divided by a wire wall. The outdoor run and pastures are divided by a 4 ft tall wire fence (chain link is best), and extra secured by an E wire at comb and waddle height... only takes once or twice before they QUICKLY learn to respect the E fence. Yes I tried it myself so I could know what they are feeling! :p
I assume the cocks/cockerels can see the hens through the wire fence? That doesn't promote fighting?
 

EggSighted4Life

Crossing the Road
5 Years
Apr 9, 2016
14,342
19,906
832
California's Redwood Coast
I assume the cocks/cockerels can see the hens through the wire fence? That doesn't promote fighting?
They can totally see the ladies. I have been using this set up for a while... more than a year. Seeing the ladies does not increase fighting as far as I can tell.

There will often be one or two stags that hang out close to the fence keeping an eye on the ladies. Since they have established their pecking order though... others respect the space. Once in a while their will be some wing dancing. And on occasion a boy may decide he wishes to claim that space for himself and pose a challenge.. which may end a SMALL amount of blood shed.

There are occasional scuffles as there would be for anyone who has to live with others they didn't even choose and may not even like.

No I do not believe having sight of the ladies increases antics. Having access to them does.

I did hang a line of sight barrier inside the coop to block the boys from viewing the lay boxes... as some would stand in their and crow it up... so, just to make it a little more peaceful for the gals. They can still see the rest of the roost and floor and such.

Nothing too major here SO FAR with more than 50 boys going on my freezer this year. If I notice a relentless Stew Pidasso... I have learned the best defense is a good offense... so I will put the chaser on the run, where he is now considering his own safety. Basically... shifting the focus. It usually works.

The hardest boys for me to keep together are often Silkies... those are the ONLY ones who actively try to mount each other. :duc They do best when kept with large fowl boys, I think it helps keep their "little man" syndrome in check. Their behavior is ONE reason I no longer raise Silkies. Have 5 Silkie cockerels going to a new home soon and then a final 5 heading to freezer camp shortly there after. Then no more Silkies. The were a fun breed to experience... just not the right breed for me. :)

However I do find this to be an ongoing learning process and I never know when I might face a new challenge. Every bird is an individual. :thumbsup
 

Trish1974

Araucana enthusiast
5 Years
Mar 16, 2016
3,079
6,857
592
North Central IN
My Coop
My Coop
They can totally see the ladies. I have been using this set up for a while... more than a year. Seeing the ladies does not increase fighting as far as I can tell.
Thanks! That's good to know. Maybe I can take down the ugly silt fence blocking the runs then. I just assumed if they could SEE the hens that would instigate fighting.
 

gimmie birdies

Free Ranging
8 Years
Feb 12, 2013
10,856
16,236
722
Eastern WA
I recently had 4 they all got along, 3 were raised from the start together, The main rooster maybe a month older was a blue copper maran and really mellow to the other younger roosters, and no one fought. Since i only had 20 hens, I decided 4 were too many, and I eliminated the crested SFH rooster, because he was not aggressive to me but crowed the most. Not long after I processed him a hawk came and took out the Blue copper maran. I can live with that, because 2 roosters are better than 3, and my favorite one was a BCM/blue cochin mix, the last rooster an EE was a beta rooster, so I didn't mind keeping him, plus he is a pretty bird. So now I have 2. I have kept them in their coop since the hawk, and they have caged outdoor pens the hawk cannot get to them. once the snow comes they will chose to stay by the coop anyway.
 

MANNA-PRO

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