Backyard poultry

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by PortugalBreeder, Oct 30, 2010.

  1. PortugalBreeder

    PortugalBreeder Chillin' With My Peeps

    449
    1
    111
    Oct 9, 2010
    As many people in here I have my own "pet" flock, they go in the run (which is my garden covered with bird netting) eat bugs, etc., and the flock is very diverse, I have several species, chickens, pheasants and quails, but lately I have been reading about contamination and diseases that infect your birds if you mix different species, anyone have been having that problem?
     
  2. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

    23,342
    1,204
    448
    Nov 27, 2008
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Quote:I dont know about pheasants or quails, but I know that turkey's can pass blackhead to chickens. But's it's normally the chicken that carries the worm that is excreted onto the ground that the turkey picks up. The worm itself contains the protazoa that infects the turkey. That's why it's recommended that chickens and turkey's should be seperated. However there's many BYC'ers that have intermixed flocks and havnt had any issues with blackhead. I think the key to that is using the correct wormer to kill the particular worm that the chicken carries, that carries the protazoa. In chickens, (Safeguard) fenbendazole kills the cecal worm that carries the protazoa. I would be more concerned with introducing new birds to an existing flock...no matter what kind of birds they are, I'd quarantine the newbies away from an existing flock for at least 30 days to inspect them and treat accordingly if they have any problems. There might be instances that you'd have to quarantine longer than 30 days at your discretion.
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2010
  3. PortugalBreeder

    PortugalBreeder Chillin' With My Peeps

    449
    1
    111
    Oct 9, 2010
    Quote:I dont know about pheasants or quails, but I know that turkey's can pass blackhead to chickens. But's it's normally the chicken that carries the worm that is excreted onto the ground that the turkey picks up. The worm itself contains the protazoa that infects the turkey. That's why it's recommended that chickens and turkey's should be seperated. However there's many BYC'ers that have intermixed flocks and havnt had any issues with blackhead. I think the key to that is using the correct wormer to kill the particular worm that the chicken carries, that carries the protazoa. In chickens, (Safeguard) fenbendazole kills the capillary worm that carries the protazoa. I would be more concerned with introducing new birds to an existing flock...no matter what kind of birds they are, I'd quarantine the newbies away from an existing flock for at least 30 days to inspect them and treat accordingly if they have any problems. There might be instances that you'd have to quarantine longer than 30 days at your discretion.

    Man thanks a lot!
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2010

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by