Bad leg bared rock

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by emagoo1, Nov 22, 2014.

  1. emagoo1

    emagoo1 Out Of The Brooder

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    I have a ? For anyone who might be able to answer. I went out to feed and water change today and my bared rock would not get up, she acts normal personality wise accept I picked her up and one of her legs is not working at all and her foot if balled as is she is holding something. I checked her all over and she doesn't appear to have any other issues but I'm not sure what to do. Any help would be appreciated.
     
  2. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    You'll have to remove the hen from the rest of the flock to prevent getting picked on. A large dog crate, exercise pen, or someplace safe and temperate. Provide food and water. How old is the hen, and were your birds vaccinated for Marek's Disease when they were day old chicks?
     
  3. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    It would not hurt to start poultry vitamins in the water in case of a riboflavin deficiency, but there can be other causes such as Mareks. Be sure that the vitamins contain riboflavin, as Poultry Nutri-Drench does not.
     
  4. emagoo1

    emagoo1 Out Of The Brooder

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    I have been reading all the threads on marek's and feel this may be what it is. And yes I have started vitamins in the water and I am going today to get some hypericum homeopathy.
     
  5. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Just because a bird cant walk doesnt mean it's marek's disease. She may have sprained or pulled a ligament or tendon jumping down from a high roost or other high object. When was the last time she laid an egg? What is her age? Have you inspected her for external parasites? Does she have bumblefoot?
     
  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    Riboflavin deficiency would be my first thought. Here are some links to read about mareks disease and vitamin deficiency, along with an article from Merck Manual about riboflavin deficiency below. The last link contains a lot of collected information about Mareks from someone who has been treating it in her flock:

    http://www.thepoultrysite.com/publications/6/diseases-of-poultry/217/vitamin-b2-deficiency
    http://extension.unh.edu/resources/files/Resource000791_Rep813.pdf
    http://partnersah.vet.cornell.edu/avian-atlas/#/disease/Marek's_Disease
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/the-great-big-giant-mareks-disease-faq

    RIBOFLAVIN DEFICIENCY

    Many tissues may be affected by riboflavin deficiency, although the epithelium and the myelin sheaths of some of the main nerves are major targets. Changes in the sciatic nerves produce “curled-toe” paralysis in growing chickens. Egg production is affected, and riboflavin-deficient eggs do not hatch. When chicks are fed a diet deficient in riboflavin, their appetite is fairly good but they grow slowly, become weak and emaciated, and develop diarrhea between the first and second weeks. Deficient chicks are reluctant to move unless forced and then frequently walk on their hocks with the aid of their wings. The leg muscles are atrophied and flabby, and the skin is dry and harsh. In advanced stages of deficiency, the chicks lie prostrate with their legs extended, sometimes in opposite directions. The characteristic sign of riboflavin deficiency is a marked enlargement of the sciatic and brachial nerve sheaths; sciatic nerves usually show the most pronounced effects. Histologic examination of the affected nerves shows degenerative changes in the myelin sheaths that, when severe, pinch the nerve. This produces a permanent stimulus, which causes the curled-toe paralysis.

    Chicks receiving diets only partially deficient in riboflavin may recover spontaneously, indicating that the requirement rapidly decreases with age. A 100-μg dose should be sufficient for treatment of riboflavin-deficient chicks, followed by incorporation of an adequate level in the diet. However, when the curled-toe deformity is longstanding, irreparable damage occurs in the sciatic nerve, and the administration of riboflavin is no longer curative.

    Most diets contain up to 10 mg riboflavin/kg. Treatment can be given as two 100 μg doses for chicks or poults, followed by an adequate amount of riboflavin in feed.
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2014
  7. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    You're right about a possible riboflavin deficiency Eggcessive; IF the BR is a chick or pullet. That's why I asked the OP for the birds age.
     
  8. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    Yes, Dawg, I also agree with you that one should consider injuries too, that may have caused temporary nerve damage to the leg. Even a spinal injury could do that. We over diagnose Mareks a lot, and it should always be mentioned as a possibility, but other simpler causes should be ruled out.
     
  9. emagoo1

    emagoo1 Out Of The Brooder

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  10. emagoo1

    emagoo1 Out Of The Brooder

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    I have to agree I'm not real sure it's mareks because she has no other symptoms just a hurt leg. She eats fine drinks fine just doesn't want to move around and it doesn't appear to be bumblefoot either. What is the best thing to do if it's something in the leg
     

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