Baldies- Vent

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by 9gerianMile, Jun 12, 2011.

  1. 9gerianMile

    9gerianMile Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Don't get me wrong, I'm as patriotic as the next person, but Bald Eagles are starting to try my patience around here. Not only are they beautiful and big- they like to eat chickens. My chickens. And I can't very well shoot them- they're protected. I'm not building a run for the chickens because they are free-range to assist with bug-control on the ranch (at which they excel greatly). I wouldn't mind so much if the Eagles were picking off the non-laying girls, but 3 layers inside of two weeks? You're hurting my feelings! Of course, my BCMs were the first to go- they were the most adventurous, much to my dismay. I'm hoping the fish come back in force in the creek and the baldies stop munching on my chickens... They are gorgeous, but now I see them with a twinge of "why I oughta..."

    I don't think there are really any options to solve this problem- not legal ones, and I love wildlife- just not when it eats my food...

    Thanks for listening(/reading).
     
  2. Oregon Blues

    Oregon Blues Overrun With Chickens

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    Only two options. Pen the birds up with a strong cover over them, or spread them out all pretty in the yard as a free lunch buffet. Maybe tuck a sprig of fresh parsley under their wings as garnish.

    Have you considered penning them just until the fish are back and the eagle fledglings are out of the nest so that the parents are no longer hunting for them?
     
  3. 9gerianMile

    9gerianMile Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well they have their coop attached to our 30X12 covered hay barn. They can then exit the hay barn (which is empty and luxurious right now) to go play in rain puddles and eat bugs- which they do. The eagles only come around every few days and they don't dive down on the property if we're out there, which we were these last couple times. They're pretty opportunistic. I'm not enclosing the whole hay barn because frankly, I'm tired, pregnant, and I work too much to actually be out there in daylight and do more than feeding and light cleaning. I know it's not a good excuse, but it's just kinda how it is right now. The girls who aren't laying seem to be baldy-smart... ironic, no?
     
  4. write2caroline

    write2caroline Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I wonder if a scare crow would work since you said they won't attack when you are out there?
    Caroline
     
  5. Mahonri

    Mahonri Urban Desert Chicken Enthusiast Premium Member

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    My Coop
    Quote:Great Idea...
     
  6. bryan99705

    bryan99705 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Are your livestock dogs any help?

    Just spitballing, but how would a eagle react to sparkling things? would it attract or cause them to shy away? Maybe a bit of Christmas tree tinsel attached to the bird's back would cause them to look elsewhere?
     
  7. 9gerianMile

    9gerianMile Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If we look up and them and move, they move on... I'll try a scarecrow to see if they buy it! And I'll find some shineys to put on the birds. We're really down to my molting birds who stay in the barn mostly, a broody hen, and 3 crazy zip zap fast pullets. Oh, and Big Bertha, my meatie from last AUGUST she lays an egg every 3-5 days and eats about half the food. She's the size of a small turkey and very fat/happy. Haven't seen an eagle yet who could pick her up.
     
  8. 9gerianMile

    9gerianMile Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 18, 2010
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    Oh and my LGD is a year old and will alert, but he's not with the chickens because he wasn't trained on them (didn't have chickens upon his introduction to the property), just the goats.
     

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